New rec center coming to Sherman? Leaders ask to spend $40K on wants, needs study

Michael Hutchins
Herald Democrat
As a part of the upcoming budget, city staff are recommending that $40,000 be dedicated to hiring a firm to conduct a study on the need for a recreation center.

City leaders in Sherman are exploring options regarding a potential new recreation center and what amenities and activities the facility could offer. 

As a part of the upcoming budget, city staff are recommending that $40,000 be dedicated to hiring a firm to conduct a study on the need for a recreation center and what features the community would like to see.

"It totally could involve a basketball gym or areas for a senior center," Recreation Coordinator Dylan Johnson said. "Really, we are bringing people in to conduct a study and tell us what the community really wants and needs."

The need for a recreation center stems from the city's most recent master plan for its parks and recreation amenities. The study, which was conducted four years ago, found that the need for a recreation center could be on the horizon within the  next decade.

"On that master plan, one of the items was that if we were to reach a population of 50,000 people, at that point based on state norms, a city would have a recreation center," he said, adding that the city is nearing that milestone.

While the details of the potential center, including what activities would be supported, remain unknown, Johnson said the facility would be larger in scope than one of the city's other recreational amenities — the Taylor Street Gym. The gym was formerly a Girls Inc. location and was remodeled in 2014 to support adult sports.

Ideally, the new site would include facilities that cater to youth of Sherman, Johnson said, noting that the city currently partners with Sherman Independent School District gym facilities.

"If we had just one more gym ... it would make a huge difference for us," he said.

The master plan still needs to be approved by the city council as a part of the upcoming budget. If approved, the earliest that the study could move forward is October, Johnson said.