With the approach of August, it’s time for Texoma bowhunters to get a little more serious about their pre-season archery practice sessions.

With the approach of August, it’s time for Texoma bowhunters to get a little more serious about their pre-season archery practice sessions.


While remembering that in this case, less can indeed be more.


Outdoor Channel television personality Lee Lakosky is among those who cautions archers to seek small sessions of perfect practice versus hours on the range spent haphazardly flinging high-speed arrows at a 3-D target.


"We shoot all of the time," said Lee, who along with wife Tiffany hosts the program Crush with Lee and Tiffany. "But you have to be smart about it."


In addition to limiting the number of arrows they shoot each day during the summer months, they also shun the high-poundage speed-bow game that many archers endorse.


"I don’t shoot excessive (draw) weights," said Tiffany. "I might go up to 60 pounds occasionally, but normally I shoot 55 pounds with a 24 ½-inch draw length.


"That setup works great too," she added. "I’ve had a few elk kills with that setup and my last two mule deer, which were taken at 60 yards, had the arrow zip right through them like they weren’t even standing there.


"I’m concerned with accuracy (in my shooting), not speed and poundage."


Husband Lee agrees, "The goal is to put the broadhead into the boiler room. If you do so, even if only half of the arrow goes in, you’ve got a dead animal at 20 yards or so.


"I don’t shoot anything radical with my Mathews bow," he added. "I just want to shoot well. My bow isn’t super fast when compared to some other people’s setups, but it is accurate. And an accurate arrow is so much more deadly than a fast arrow."


In addition to having an accurate bow, for Lee, it’s also about limiting the wear and tear on the body that shooting high speed, heavy poundage bows can inflict over time.


"As you get older, you see a lot of guys shooting leagues and tournaments (in the off-season months) and taking a lot of shots," said Lee. "Sometimes, those guys end up having shoulder problems and that’s not something I want to deal with.


"I want to be sheep hunting at 70."