I don’t know if most people like the band U2, but suffice to say that many people do. They’ve sold more than 150 million records, and Bono’s mom couldn’t have bought more than, like, a few hundred of those. So yeah, they’re popular.

I don’t know if most people like the band U2, but suffice to say that many people do. They’ve sold more than 150 million records, and Bono’s mom couldn’t have bought more than, like, a few hundred of those. So yeah, they’re popular.


I cannot and have never been able to reconcile the fact of that popularity with what my ears hear when a U2 song comes on the radio, which is something akin to a sick heifer being bludgened with several broken guitars. I just can’t fathom how there are millions of people out there who hear something different — something they actually believe is music.


For most of life, though, U2 and I have kept our distance. I’ve done my thing, and Bono’s done his thing — which, from what I can tell, has involved spending a ton of time in Africa and supporting only the very worst political causes. It’s been a tenuous peace, but peace nonetheless.


That all changed last week when U2 went all Pearl Harbor on my iTunes and executed a sneak attack behind my defenses that escalated our relationship into full-on hostilities.


I was in my living room, minding my own business and listening to a collection of songs recently added to my music collection; in fact I had just wrapped up a little impromptu karaoke with Hank Thompson’s "Wild Side of Life."


Then, the sound of fury.


Apple, in its infinite wisdom, had "pushed" U2’s new album into my computer, which is techno-babble for "forced it down my throat." They took the formerly Bono-free zone of my hard drive and sullied it with an entire record’s worth of self-righteous bleating. And what’s worse, they put the album in the cloud, making it impossible to delete. The world’s most socially conscious band had staged a communist takeover of my poor little Mac.


Thankfully, I wasn’t alone in my outrage. In response to all the chants of "Bono, no-no" rising from the ether of the Internet, Apple provided a tool through which U2-haters could delete the album. But for me, it was too late.


You can never regain your (Songs of) Innocence.



Happy birthday Monday to Connie Hartwig, Gil Nelson, Kayla Ann Buck and Judy Wood, all of Sherman; Karen Ellis of Luella; Mary Brock, Rev. Jim Branscum, Pastor Billy W. Milam and Sue Ricks, all of Denison; Pat Crookham of Southmayd; Ruby Dodd Miskey of San Antonio; Percy Steward; and Tharon A. Shears of Whitesboro.


Happy anniversary Monday to Alvin Brown Sr., and Cynthia Brown of Sherman, 35 years.