Perhaps as you’re reading this column, you’ve already had your first sip of coffee today — that eye-opening elixir that you swear boosts your productivity and might be the only reason you can smile during the day. I’m right there in that camp with you. Sometimes all a bad day needs is a good cup of Joe to turn it around.

Perhaps as you’re reading this column, you’ve already had your first sip of coffee today — that eye-opening elixir that you swear boosts your productivity and might be the only reason you can smile during the day. I’m right there in that camp with you. Sometimes all a bad day needs is a good cup of Joe to turn it around.


But what about all the naysayers out there who manage to get by with a simple cup of tea, or, heaven forbid, absolutely nothing? These are the people who preach to the java enthusiasts that our morning fuel is bad for us.


Fortunately, TIME magazine has stood up for the liquid energy lovers. In an article titled, "You asked: Is coffee bad for you?" readers pose the question that plagues our modern lives. TIME answered with a resounding, "No."


TIME spoke with Dr. Rob van Dam, a disease and nutrition expert at Harvard School of Public Health, who basically has my dream job of examining coffee and its health effects.


"Van Dam and his colleagues analyzed health and diet data on roughly 130,000 adults spanning 24 years," TIME reports. "They found no evidence that drinking coffee increases your risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease, or other causes. That was true even for people who knocked back 48 ounces of coffee a day. In fact, there was some indication that regular coffee drinkers might enjoy a slight drop in mortality risk, van Dam says."


Can I get an amen?


Granted, the way I personally drink coffee probably won’t drop my mortality rate. I believe in dumping more than my share of a spoonful of sugar, and my dark concoction is usually almost white.


So then I wondered when it would be best to take my first sip of coffee. A Washington Post article titled "A coffee addict’s guide to the universe" used a graph showing how drinking coffee while cortisol production is high leads us to become immune to its effects. The article says there are three times throughout the day — morning, midday and evening — when cortisol levels rise. The key is to drink coffee between those peaks when it is actually most needed. So for me, I now try to take my first sip of java at about 1 p.m.


Bottoms up.



Happy birthday Sunday to Constance Marie Wright and Ed Supenia, both of Denison; Schalanda Nicole Braxton of Dallas; Bessie Dolezalek of Southmayd; Cynthia Beene, Da’Niyah Wiley, Pat Bohrer Yoast, and Ronnie Peterson Jr., all of Sherman; Robert Erwin Oberdorf of San Antonio; Craig Williams; and Kaleb Wroten.


Happy anniversary Sunday to J. Ross and Polly Morrow of Denison, 44 years.