Two students from Grayson College’s 2015 graduating class have earned their certificate or degree before receiving their high school diplomas. Dave Sanderson of Pottsboro graduated magna cum laude with an associate degree of science while Toby Taylor of Whitewright earned a welding certificate.

Two students from Grayson College’s 2015 graduating class have earned their certificate or degree before receiving their high school diplomas. Dave Sanderson of Pottsboro graduated magna cum laude with an associate degree of science while Toby Taylor of Whitewright earned a welding certificate.


Sanderson decided he wanted to pursue his associate degree his freshman year while attending Pottsboro High School. After being unable to his degree while at PHS, Sanderson said he transferred to Denison High School in order to make sure he could reach his goal.


"He works hard to get a good education. He doesn’t wait around for it to come to him," DHS science teacher Scott Deen said. "I’m proud of how far he’s come and I can’t wait to see what he does with life."


In the fall, Sanderson will be starting his bachelor’s degree in computer science at the University of North Texas. Before that, he said he will be taking prerequisites at Collin College to cut his graduation time to two and a half years.


"It’s not about being smart," Sanderson said. "It’s all about commitment and planning."


Taylor was the first Whitewright student to enroll and complete the welding certificate at Grayson College. He balanced not only high school and college classes but also a full-time job.


"It’s exciting," Taylor said. "It’s something I wanted to do, and I put forth effort to make it happen."


Whitewright High School agricultural science teacher Bill Dusenberry said Taylor is a natural at welding. He said Taylor wasn’t afraid to learn and because of that, he has gotten better at welding and matured over the years.


"For kids who are not as advanced as him, he has helped me pull those kids in and show them different things," Dusenberry said. "I see him going as far as he wants with it. He’s got everything he needs to be successful and it’s up to him to the footsteps in place to be successful."


Taylor said he believes welding has helped him become a better person. In the fall, he will enroll for his associate degree for welding at Grayson College. Taylor said he hopes his experience will take him to work on the Keystone Pipeline.


"A lot of people can (weld) but it takes skill to make it look right and put it to use," Taylor said. "It’s good to have the piece of paper to show you can do it."