In the race to represent the Fourth District of Texas, Rep. John Ratcliffe pulled out a victory with 65.7 percent of the counted votes as of 11:30 p.m. Ratcliffe received 12,492 votes in Grayson County compared to 4,604 votes for his opponent, Lou Gigliotti, and 1,572 votes for Ray Hall. Ratcliffe received 3,312 votes in Fannin County compared to Gigliotti’s 1,100 votes and Hall’s 696 votes.

In the race to represent the Fourth District of Texas, Rep. John Ratcliffe pulled out a victory with 65.7 percent of the counted votes as of 11:30 p.m. Ratcliffe received 12,492 votes in Grayson County compared to 4,604 votes for his opponent, Lou Gigliotti, and 1,572 votes for Ray Hall. Ratcliffe received 3,312 votes in Fannin County compared to Gigliotti’s 1,100 votes and Hall’s 696 votes.


Describing his victory, Ratcliffe said voters in Grayson County were instrumental to his success Tuesday night, noting the number of events that he attended locally during his first year in office.


"Grayson County is such an important part of this district," Ratcliffe said. "I had to do well here, and I did do well here."


Ratcliffe first won his seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in May 2014 after defeating incumbent Ralph Hall, who served 17 terms in office, in a runoff. In discussing his first race as an incumbent, Ratcliffe said he felt humbled by his victory Tuesday night as polls suggested many incumbents were behind.


For his part, Gigliotti said he felt he got outspent in the race, which led to Tuesday’s result.


"I don’t know what to say, I really don’t know what to say," he said.


This is the fourth time Gigliotti has run for the House seat, following losses to Hall in the 2010 and 2012 Republican primaries, and a six-candidate race in the 2014 primary.


Referencing concerns of conflicts of interest and political corruption, Gigliotti said, "the only way I will run again is if Ratcliffe is in an orange jumpsuit."


After announcing his victory Tuesday, Ratcliffe said he intends to pursue a bill that would increase the border patrol presence with additional manpower and other high tech security, including unmanned drones and subterranean sensors. Additionally, Ratcliffe said he planned to push for interior security by promoting an e-verifying system to prevent falsified information from being used to apply for employment.


During the campaign, Ratcliffe said he would introduce and support legislation to increase security along the border between Mexico and the U.S. Security could be increased by building a 700-mile fence, but additional boots on the ground will also be required along some portions of the border, Ratcliffe said.


In his second term, Ratcliffe said he will help push for North Texas Regional Airport — Perrin Field to be included in the Federal Aviation Administration’s contract tower program. Through this program, the FAA would fund the operation of the control tower. This would help provide nearly $500,000 of service each year and reduce Grayson County’s obligation by nearly $275,000 annually.


In his first year as a freshman representative, Ratcliffe said he has also helped push forward other measures including the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, which had failed to pass Congress three times in the past. The act, which Ratcliffe co-authored, is designed to provide better avenues for the government and private entities to discuss potential security threats with each other and disseminate information.


"Cybersecurity is one of the greatest threats to our national security," he said.


In his campaign for re-election, Ratcliffe received the endorsement of groups such as the National Right to Life, Texas Right to Life and Sen. Ted Cruz, he said.


Before his time in Washington, Ratcliffe served as the Chief of Anti-terrorism and National Security and Attorney for the Eastern District of Texas under President George W. Bush. In these roles Ratcliffe focused his efforts on cases involving undocumented immigrants and individuals using identity theft and social security fraud to unlawfully gain employment in the U.S.