The tractor-trailer that struck a bus carrying a softball team from North Central Texas College in Gainesville showed no sign of stopping or swerving before crashing into the bus, federal officials said Sunday.

The tractor-trailer that struck a bus carrying a softball team from North Central Texas College in Gainesville showed no sign of stopping or swerving before crashing into the bus, federal officials said Sunday.


"The preliminary look at the tire marks finds no indication of skidding, braking or evasive maneuvers," Robert Sumwalt, a member of the National Transportation Safety Board, said in a press conference Sunday. He said investigators will be able to get a more accurate picture by examining the truck’s computer and other evidence to be collected in the coming days. Sumwalt said a preliminary, post-accident inspection of the truck revealed no apparent defects.


The crash, which happened Friday night near Davis, Okla., left four of the players dead, including three from the local area. Jaiden Pelton, 20, of Telephone; Katelynn Woodlee, 18, of Windom; and Brooke Deckard, 20, of Blue Ridge were all killed. Wylie resident Meagan Richardson, 19, was also killed.


Another local woman, Cassidy Hall, 20, of Ravenna, was injured in the crash. She was treated and released from the hospital and attended a vigil Saturday in honor of Ms. Richardson. Christi Petty, 19, of Bonham, told the Dallas Morning News that Hall appeared to be "pretty banged up" and used a wheelchair to attend the vigil. "She didn’t talk. … She was very shook up."


The 10 remaining team members were taken to hospitals, but most were treated and released. Only two women remained hospitalized Sunday. Eighteen-year-old Bailey Buchanan was in stable condition at Oklahoma University Medical Center and 19-year-old Rachel Hitt was listed in fair condition at Norman Regional Hospital, the Associated Press reported Sunday. The team’s coach, Van Hendrick, was driving the bus. He was also treated and released.


The truck driver, Russell Staley, 53, of Saginaw, Texas, was treated and released. Oklahoma Highway Patrol Capt. George Brown told the AP there are no charges pending against Staley. Authorities have said they are investigating the crash as a homicide. Investigators said Saturday that both drivers are being given toxicology tests, a standard procedure.


According to the AP, Staley told investigators he was distracted by something inside the truck, but investigators have not released any more details. Sumwalt said the NTSB and OHP are working together to inventory the contents of the cab.


The accident occurred at a curve in the road on Interstate 35, Sumwalt said Sunday. He said, the truck, which was traveling northbound, continued on a straight path instead of following the curve in the road. The truck traveled approximately 820 feet and through a 90-foot median before it hit the bus. Then, Sumwalt said, the truck traveled another 300 feet before stopping after hitting some trees.


Investigators had not interviewed Staley as of Sunday afternoon, Sumwalt said, and the Dallas Morning News reported that no one answered at Staley’s home and that he could not be reached for comment.


Quickway Transportation of Nashville, Tenn. is the company Stanley was driving for. The company posted a statement from CEO William P. Prevost offering condolences to the families of the women who died in the crash.


"We are also praying for a full recovery for the ladies that remain in the hospital," the statement says. "Trusting in God’s grace, we hope to one day join the college in properly memorializing these ladies lives, and their legacy. We will continue to fully cooperate with" investigators.


Sumwalt said investigators will continue collecting evidence in the coming days and still plan to interview Stanley and one of the women hospitalized. He said one witness has already come forward, and Sumwalt asked that other witnesses of the crash contact the NTSB by calling 866-328-6347 or emailing witness@ntsb.gov.


Investigators said on Saturday that they expect to remain in Oklahoma for approximately a week collecting evidence.