The sound of a jackhammer means one of two things: Either something’s being built, or something’s being torn down. In the case of the jackhammers currently echoing through the streets of downtown Sherman, it just so happens to be a bit of both. As part of a joint effort between Downtown Sherman Preservation and Revitalization and the Downtown Sherman Endowment, crews are working to tear-up 26 sections of sidewalk to create planter boxes on Travis and Houston streets near Sherman’s Courthouse Square.

The sound of a jackhammer means one of two things: Either something’s being built, or something’s being torn down. In the case of the jackhammers currently echoing through the streets of downtown Sherman, it just so happens to be a bit of both. As part of a joint effort between Downtown Sherman Preservation and Revitalization and the Downtown Sherman Endowment, crews are working to tear-up 26 sections of sidewalk to create planter boxes on Travis and Houston streets near Sherman’s Courthouse Square.


"They should be finished this week with cutting (the holes), and then they have to form the lip, so that’s the next stage," said DSP&R Executive Director Karen Tooley. "Then we have to dig out the compressed dirt so that something can actually grow."


The local O.D. Mayor Foundation provided grant money to construct the boxes. Once complete, the planters will provide a home for crape myrtle trees, which are being bought by local businesses and philanthropists.


"We’ve probably sold a third, so we’d like to sell the other two-thirds and get that done. There’s going to be a big push after the Wine Stroll on Oct. 11," said Tooley. "There are several people who are going to recognize their business; there’s one person who’s doing it in honor of their first grandchild; there’s the Earth Day Festival, which is an exciting event and they want to get their name out. Many of them (the businesses) have committed to doing the watering for the trees, which is wonderful."


The crape myrtles will be clustered, block-by-block, according to the color of their flowers, said Tooley. Organizers have set a target date of Nov. 1 to have the new vegetation planted.


"It’s really exciting," said Tooley. "It’s going to green-up downtown and add a splash of color on every block."


Those interesting in purchase a tree at a cost of $350, which includes a dedication plaque, are encouraged to contact Downtown Sherman Preservation and Revitalization at 903-816-2811.