POTTSBORO — Preston Volunteer Emergency Services will soon have a new EMS station. About 100 people gathered at the site of the future station Friday to celebrate its groundbreaking.

POTTSBORO — Preston Volunteer Emergency Services will soon have a new EMS station. About 100 people gathered at the site of the future station Friday to celebrate its groundbreaking.


The groundbreaking for the new station, which will be located just east of State Highway 289 on the north side of County Road 406, was lead by PVES officials and community leaders. Although it was a hot and sunny morning, ceremony attendees smiled and talked of the project with excitement.


PVES brings emergency fire and medical services to a 96-square-mile district, which includes Pottsboro, Mineral Creek and Flowing Wells, said PVES President Mike Davis. About one year ago, PVES officials realized that the population of the area was growing and that PVES should expand beyond its one station at 85584 N. State Highway 289.


The new station will house PVES’s two ambulances, and the paramedics will be housed there during their 24-hour shifts.


"We (realized that) we needed to move the facility closer to the center of the district to have better response times to everybody," Davis said.


The new location fulfills the need of expediting ambulance response times. There is also the convenience of being near two major roads.


Davis called the project the "dream of one particular person," PVES Foundation leader Nancy Anderson.


"This project took the ‘three P’s’ to get going: patience, perseverance and persistence," Anderson said.


PVES is a nonprofit organization and operates entirely on donations, she said. The construction of the new station is expected to cost in the "hundreds of thousands," and funds raised from the Boot Scootin’ Ball, January’s chili dinner and personal donations have made the project possible.


Grayson County resident Billy Clemons donated the land to PVES, Davis said.


Pottsboro Mayor Frank Budra told those gathered that donating to and supporting PVES is essential to the community.


"Imagine that you’re driving home from church. Your wife is in the passenger’s seat, and your two kids are in the back. Suddenly, a truck pulls out in front of you from a side road. That’s the last thing you remember," Budra said. "When you regain consciousness, you see that your wife is passed out and your kids are quiet. Then, you notice that EMTs are working on them. … Now, imagine that scenario without the EMTs."


"We need them," Budra said. "I’m glad the new station will be here — I hope you never need it."


The new station is expected to be completed by the end of this year. PVES is also working on remodeling the original station.