POTTSBORO — Frontier Days in Pottsboro has changed over the years. The event draws its inspiration from back in the 1800s, when cowboys would stop in the town for a rest as they drove cattle south to the State Fair of Texas.

POTTSBORO — Frontier Days in Pottsboro has changed over the years. The event draws its inspiration from back in the 1800s, when cowboys would stop in the town for a rest as they drove cattle south to the State Fair of Texas.


"They would camp out for a week. The locals came out and they fed them and they partied," said Rosemary Hall, manager of the Pottsboro Area Chamber of Commerce. "Of course, then they started shooting at each other."


Now, as Hall noted, the event has become "much more family-oriented." Rather than shootouts and cattle drives, hundreds of people turned out for fairground rides, food, contests and music Saturday at Pottsboro’s Friendship Park.


The sun shone Saturday with a cool breeze, warm enough to eat homemade ice cream, but cool enough to keep from roasting while in line for the Ferris wheel. Chamber President Bobby Hancock, who helped organize part of the event, said he didn’t take that weather for granted.


"The last two years we’ve had torrential downpours," Hancock said. "Last year we got halfway through the parade and I thought we were going to make it, but then the heavens opened and we were drowned rats."


This year, fortunately, umbrellas were not needed and the turnout for the events was much higher, said Hancock. Pottsboro residents were out in droves to hear local music, eat funnel cake and kettle corn, and visit with one another.


Dozens of local businesses and organizations had set up tents in the park, offering freebies and raffles. Political parties were on hand to register voters.


Tracy Homuth, a local broker, had set up a booth for his group, but he said his heart wasn’t quite in it. "It’s more a community thing than a business thing," Homuth said. "We do a lot of business, but really we are just here to be a part of the community today."


Homuth said small-town community events like this were a big reason why he moved away from the Metroplex. He said he loves the way Frontier Days makes him feel like part of a town, and he also loves the barbecue sandwiches available for sale. "Oh my goodness," he said. "They are huge."


One part of a community is service, and Boy Scout Troop 55 had that covered Saturday. Parker Barnett was one of a handful of Scouts in neon yellow shirts using his time at Frontier Days to pick up garbage.


"We do like to volunteer and help work, help keep this place clean because we care about this park," Barnett said. It also helped that the Scouts were getting paid a small amount, he added. "We can always use some moolah."


Troop 55 has helped clean the park during and after Frontier Days for several years, and also marches at the front of the parade before the event. As a Pottsboro resident, Barnett said he looks forward to Frontier Days every year.


"I enjoy meeting the smiling faces of all these townsfolk, getting around, being together, being able to shop. It’s just great. Everybody is so friendly and kind," Barnett said.


All in all, the environment Saturday was very different than it must have been in a frontier cow camp. But, according to Hancock, adapting to the times is part of Pottsboro’s history, too.


"We’ve been through some transitions over the last hundred years," he said. "But this event mainly gets the community together to celebrate who we are in Pottsboro: down-home, friendly folks."