Grayson County Commissioners approved a resolution Tuesday to allow golf carts or similar utility vehicles to operate on some roadways in unincorporated areas of the county.

Grayson County Commissioners approved a resolution Tuesday to allow golf carts or similar utility vehicles to operate on some roadways in unincorporated areas of the county.


Approved unanimously, the resolution adopts section 551.404 of the Texas Transportation Code, which will allow licensed drivers to operate the carts on public roadways with speed limits of 35 mph or less. The resolution is only for unincorporated areas of the county, not inside city limits.


"My precinct covers the lake and a lot of them come to me complaining because they have been stopped and told they’re illegal on the roadways," Mike Reeves, justice of the peace for Precinct 3, said. "Law enforcement is only doing their job, but these are elderly people, not kids."


Reeves said he started working to put the resolution together about a year ago to present to the commissioners. The resolution doesn’t apply to any Grayson County cities, as individual cities would have to adopt their own rules on the matter.


The transportation code defines a golf cart as a vehicle designed by a manufacturer for a golf course. A utility vehicle is defined as having side-by-side seating with four wheels and designed by a manufacturer for off-highway utility work, not for recreational purposes. Under the code, the vehicles must have headlamps, tail lamps, reflectors, a parking brake and mirrors.


County Judge Bill Magers said there was a demand from the public to make this resolution happen.


"I think it’s an acknowledgment that the market has said these golf carts and utility vehicles are being used currently," Magers said. "We, as the Commissioners Court, want to make sure our citizens have the right to do these things safely."


DMV changes


The commissioners approved a resolution to oppose rule changes to Chapter 217 of the Texas Administrative Code, which were proposed by the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles. The changes would affect vehicle title and registration fees the DMV collects. Magers told commissioners the proposed rule changes were designed to get more citizens to use the online registration program but at a cost to the counties.


He said at face value the changes appear less expensive, but the state is going to underfund the program to let counties’ general funds make up the difference. So the county would lose revenue over time. Magers said the resolution asks the state to make sure their fees are such that counties can pay the bills without going into a deficit.


"We’re not opposed to online registration to make it easier for the consumer, but it needs to be priced correctly so the county doesn’t end up subsidizing the program for the state," Magers said.


GCSO grant


The commissioners approved the Grayson County Sheriff’s Office to accept a $2,000 grant from the Wal-Mart Community Grant Program. Chief Deputy Tom Watt said the money would go toward buying cameras and gear, with some also going toward the department’s training fund.