Hoping to get children involved in campus and community beautification, Austin College invited children in kindergarten through fifth grade to come learn about plants at the school’s Roo Bound Earth Day celebration Saturday.

Hoping to get children involved in campus and community beautification, Austin College invited children in kindergarten through fifth grade to come learn about plants at the school’s Roo Bound Earth Day celebration Saturday.


"We want them to start thinking about our planet and sustaining the environment," Roo Bound co-chair Ana Maria Rea said. "We think it is important for children to create good habits. It is a lifestyle and if we can facilitate that with giving kids information, we think it will be really beneficial in kick starting that process in improving our environment not just here on campus but out in the world as well."


The children got to apply what they learned when Roo Bound members helped them create seed bombs out of clay and an assortment of seeds from plants native to Texas. The seed bombs were later planted around campus.


"Kids can do a lot," Rea said. "We, oftentimes, are very short sighted in the role that we can play in national and world events. We need to start instilling great lifestyle choices because these kids are the ones that are going to make the decisions in the world tomorrow."


Natalie and Mackenzie Duncan, who attended the event, already knew about planting seeds before attending Saturday’s event, so they used their knowledge to create more than 10 seed bombs.


"We try to plant a whole garden every year with our mom," Natalie Duncan said. " I really like gardening and next year we get to make our own separate gardens."


Mackenzie Duncan said that when she has her own garden, she is going to make sure that there are a lot of watermelons.


"This year our garden has a lot of tomatoes and lettuce, but I can’t wait to see what these seeds will look like when we get big," she said.


Fellow attendee Aubrie Triutt also wants to see the seeds she planted grow tall at Austin College.


"I liked walking around the campus and seeing all the flowers more than I liked getting dirty making the seed bombs," she said.


While the event was fun for the children, Rea said that learning how to preserve the Earth is what they will take home with them.


"If we can plant a little seed of curiosity in the minds of these children today then we have done our job," Rea said. "You can do things now that will make lasting changes tomorrow. As long as we push children to think of the world in terms of tomorrow, they can affect future generations and do the things that my generation didn’t necessarily do."