Ahead of retirements in city leadership planned for early 2020, Sherman is looking for a new director of engineering. Current Director of Engineering Clint Philpott will be promoted to assistant city manager in January with the retirement of Steve Ayers, who has filled the role since 2017.


City Manager Robby Hefton said the decision to move Philpott into the assistant city manager role represents a restructuring of some positions and duties within city leadership.


“Clint will be over public works, engineering and everything in the development realm — the meat and bread of what we do,” City Manager Robby Hefton said. “That will leave a hole in the role of director of engineering as Clint can’t do both roles.”


Ayers has worked with the city for about 30 years including nearly 25 years with the Sherman Police Department, including two years as its assistant police chief. Ayers moved into a city hall position in 2015 as the community and support services manager.


Philpott has also served in city for about five years. Prior to his time in Sherman, he served in the public utilities department for the city of Lubbock.


“Whatever Robby needs me to do, I will be here to do it,” Philpott said.


Hefton said that Philpott will come into the position with a wide skill set including experience with public works, engineering and work with outside developers.


“He will be coming in with a a broad range of skills already and the education and certifications that lend itself to that as well,”Hefton said.


In addition to Ayers, Sherman Director of Utilities Mark Gibson will also be retiring following more than 30 years of service. This vacancy will be filled with a new assistant city engineer role, which the city currently has listed for applicants. With this position, Hefton said the city will redistribute the duties of the engineering and utility roles across several positions.


Hefton admitted that it is a heavy loss for the city to lose two of its highest leadership roles at once, but it was one that had been expected.


“To be honest, it is (a big hit) all at once,” Hefton said. “I knew coming into this job that we had a number of senior-level managers that were eligible for retirement. As is often the case, when one announces retirement it starts a cascade.”