AMARILLO — Producer and board member Jack Norman of Howe recently retired from the Texas Wheat Producers board after many years of service.


“My time at Texas Wheat has been a very worthwhile investment,” Norman said in a press release. “I feel that the work the board does, such as funding research projects and legislative advocacy in Washington, D.C., will continue to positively impact wheat producers.”


Norman was born and raised in south Grayson County. He graduated from East Texas State University with a degree in business administration and went on to join his family’s wheat, corn and grain sorghum operation in Grayson and Fannin counties. He farmed with his parents, brother Alton, son David, nephew Jay and grandson Tyler.


Norman was first elected to the TWPB in 1985 as a representative for District IV. He was named chairman in 1989 and served until 1991. Norman has also represented Texas on both the U.S. Wheat Associates and National Association of Wheat Growers board of directors. During his term with USW, he traveled to Africa to promote high quality U.S. wheat to millers and bakers.


Over the years, Norman has received various accolades for his accomplishments in farming, conservation and marketing, including Grayson County Farmer of the Year in 1987 and the Fort Worth Star Telegram Texas Best in Wheat award in 1993.


Aside from his participation on the board, Norman has also been active in his community. He was a member of the Grayson County College board of trustees for over 30 years, as well as the Howe Independent Bank board of directors, the Howe Baptist Church and other organizations.


Norman’s position has been filled by Tyler Norman based on the results of the TWPB biennial election. Tyler will be sworn in at the board meeting in August.


The TWPB is a statewide board funded by a voluntary two cent per bushel checkoff program. Checkoff funds are used for research, market development and education to further the wheat industry in Texas and support the profitability of wheat producers. For more information, visit http://www.texaswheat.org.