I’m a 70s person. I don’t mean my age or the calendar year, because I have passed both of those. I’m thinking "driving on U.S. Highway 75" (the highway number, not the new speed limit). Since the speed limit was raised to 75 miles per hour on that busy highway through Denison, the traffic has to be going 80 mph, 85 mph or faster.

I’m a 70s person. I don’t mean my age or the calendar year, because I have passed both of those. I’m thinking "driving on U.S. Highway 75" (the highway number, not the new speed limit). Since the speed limit was raised to 75 miles per hour on that busy highway through Denison, the traffic has to be going 80 mph, 85 mph or faster.


Sunday while driving to Sherman, I began forming this column in my head as I was driving along about 70 miles an hour and everyone else – and I do mean "everyone" — was zipping past me.


Nearly every night our local television stations talk about a car accident somewhere on Highway 75 and it’s no wonder. I may be wrong, but it seems like the number of vehicles and their speed have doubled in the last few months.


Recently I have looked for an alternate route to my Sherman destination and have found one. I have two alternate routes to suggest for slow pokes like me who prefer the top speed to be 55 or 70. Texoma Parkway, where the speed limit is 55 mph, is a little slower but is less traveled and is a good alternate route, but Highway 131 is the best-kept route is you are going to Highway 82 or to the mall. I have driving that route and only seen four or five cars driving with me. It is wonderful.


I have even noticed a lot of people traveling the service road from Denison to Sherman where the speed limit is 55 mph. I have done it myself often because of repairs on Highway 75. But you better not drive 75 mph along that route unless you want to be ticketed. Also the service road coming toward Denison from Sherman can become a little tricky in the northbound service road.


Now, I’m glad I got that off my mind. Whatever route or speed you drive, please drive safely, something is responsible for all the accidents, some fatal. Speed plus all the other distractions including use cell phones are not a good mix.


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Now let’s go to another subject. While filing some pages in my newly organized files I ran across a March 1971 Frontier Diary that was taken from the March 16, 1875, Denison Daily News telling about Mr. Euper opening his first ice cream parlor. Recently in this column we talked about the man who concocted the first ice cream soda.


While the location of the parlor isn’t included in this article, we know it was in the 300 block West Main. The article said the parlor rooms had been fitted in a style that would be a credit to one of the large eastern cities. The ladies’ parlor was elegantly carpeted and the windows were hung with lace curtains and had nice new tables, chairs and everything that would add to the comfort of guests.


Decorations that were the result of the artistic taste of a Mrs. Cottroux were "simply magnificent." Here the reporter said he was alluding principally to the tissue paper work. "The monster rosette which ornaments the ceiling in the center of the room over the chandelier is superior to anything of the kind we have ever seen. All colors of the rainbow are blended in stars, spangles and wreaths. Young men don’t forget to take the young ladies around today," the article concluded.


An editor’s note at the end of the column pointed out that the claim made by Euper about inventing the ice cream soda in his Denison parlor had not been successfully refuted.


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A brief item in the 40 years ago column dated August 5, 2012, concerning an August 5, 1972, story published in the Denison Herald tells about Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s nine-foot tall bronze statue being kidnapped in Germany, but making it safely to Denison anyway.


Robert Dean, the sculptor of the statue, told the story on a brief stop in Denison. He said he had some bad moments on an Air Force base in Germany when he missed the statue from a GI truck. He said that he was preparing to fly back to Italy and had left the 700-pound statue for the Texas National Guard to fly to the states when he discovered it missing. The air police and the German police were called in, but Dean had to leave. The next day he learned that it had been recovered undamaged.


He said it had been a practical joke, but he wasn’t laughing since it represented a year’s work. When the statue arrived in Denison it was safely stored at the local National Guard Armory waiting to be set at Eisenhower Birthplace when the grounds were prepared and landscaped for the unveiling that took place as planned.


Julie Nixon Eisenhower, the daughter of Richard Nixon and the wife of David Eisenhower, the general’s grandson, was on hand for the unveiling


The statue of Eisenhower, who later became President of the U.S., has been standing north of his birthplace since that day.


Donna Hunt is a former editor of The Denison Herald. She lives in Denison and can be contacted at donnahunt544@gmail.com.