The Sherman Police Department on Saturday held its biannual Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, offering local residents a safe, anonymous, free disposal service for no-longer-needed pills. Sherman was one of more than 4,000 jurisdictions taking part in the event nationwide, which is sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Administration.

The Sherman Police Department on Saturday held its biannual Prescription Drug Take-Back Day, offering local residents a safe, anonymous, free disposal service for no-longer-needed pills. Sherman was one of more than 4,000 jurisdictions taking part in the event nationwide, which is sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Administration.


"We do it twice a year, in April and in October, and it just gives people an opportunity to properly dispose of unused drugs," said SPD Property Evidence Supervisor Joanna Curry, who manned a booth with Assistant Chief Steve Ayers in front of police headquarters. "Sometimes people tell us that a relative has passed away and they’re bringing their items. Or they may tell us they’ve been holding on to them for awhile and they’re glad we’re having this so we can dispose of them," she said.


Across the city at the Sherman Town Center, Detective Rob Ballew staffed the PD’s second location. It was the detective’s first year of involvement in the event, but he was quick to point out its importance.


"If you flush drugs down the toilet, there’s a high potential to contaminate the water system," Ballew explained as a light rain picked up its pace. "This event lets you get stuff that you don’t use out of your home. Otherwise, if you have — you know — those family members or friends who want to ‘visit the bathroom’ regularly, your medications begin to disappear, but if you don’t use them, you don’t know."


For Shermanite Pat Scott, the drug take-back is mutually beneficial for herself as well as the community, and Saturday provided another chance to take advantage of the service.


"I try to do it every time," she said. "Some (drugs) are expired and some we just don’t take anymore. When my father died, I flushed a whole bunch of stuff, and that was really bad. I’m glad we have this program now, because it’s a lot better for the environment, and it’s also safer for kids."