The inaugural Nightmare on Travis Street was, well, a bit of a nightmare on Saturday night, due to heavy rains that began pounding downtown Sherman right as the event kicked off around 6 p.m. Events that were planned for the outdoors — live music, food carts and children’s activities among them — were hastily relocated into businesses surrounding the courthouse square. But once the event found drier ground, crowds began to arrive and things proceeded mostly as planned.

The inaugural Nightmare on Travis Street was, well, a bit of a nightmare on Saturday night, due to heavy rains that began pounding downtown Sherman right as the event kicked off around 6 p.m. Events that were planned for the outdoors — live music, food carts and children’s activities among them — were hastily relocated into businesses surrounding the courthouse square. But once the event found drier ground, crowds began to arrive and things proceeded mostly as planned.


"We’ve still got music all over the place," said event organizer Karen Tully, her hair soaked but spirits not dampened. "My big, big disappointment is we had Little Katy Train here from the Denison museum; they made one circuit and had to go home."


The departure of the train meant Elizabeth Kubacki and her friend, who were both slated to work at the event before the weather forced the downscale, were free to enjoy the wine stroll, wet as it was, featuring 10 area wineries.


One of those winery booths from Paris Vineyards — located appropriately in Paris, Texas — was manned by Matthew McCormick, who said the poor weather was a surprise.


"We’ve been getting hit pretty hard in Paris, so I thought it’d be nice to come over here and have some nice, dry weather," said Matthews. "But we’ve done wine strolls over here before, and it’s always really fun to come and do it."


The Nightmare event, which for the first time combined the Downtown Sherman Preservation and Revitalization organization’s Halloween Gala with the aforementioned wine stroll, will try again next year, said organizers.


"We sold 200 tickets the last time we did the wine stroll in March, so it’ll be interesting to see how many we sell tonight," said Tully. "But last year’s Halloween party was a big storm too, so we’re thinking maybe we’re just slow learners," she said with a laugh.