Editor’s note: This letter is regarding another letter to the editor entitled "Was SHS Coach Gary Kinne forced out?" which appeared on this page on Jan. 26.

Editor’s note: This letter is regarding another letter to the editor entitled "Was SHS Coach Gary Kinne forced out?" which appeared on this page on Jan. 26.


In his recent letter to the editor, the author refers to the recently resigned SHS Football Coach as "a Winner." It’s obvious from his stated criteria he is basing his position solely on the football team’s winning percentage.


The question is, in high school athletics, is that enough? In the spectrum of sports (youth leagues, high school, college and professional), most would agree you would utilize different criteria to measure a coaches performance. In youth leagues, the goal is to teach skills, effort and sportsmanship. As you move across the spectrum, spectator emphasis shifts to winning.


I believe most parents would agree that at the high school level, the emphasis for all programs offered should be on building skills that will be valued long after the games have finished.


While one can argue as to whether this was a big or small thing, the public message to all of us was clear; there appeared to be no remorse and that state rules seemed unimportant. As to whether the coach was forced out? If removing the athletic director position (and the stipend that goes with it) was a move that forced the individual out, then that is a fair question.


A teacher will often say that an individual "earns their own grade." In the case where an individual is responsible for leading the entire SISD athletic program, the grade (or demotion) seemed appropriate. As a final thought, I disagree with the writer’s contention that the previous football coach couldn’t win.


While he lost support over the years, he led many playoff runs, including the state semifinals in the fall of 2004. And as far as I can remember, there was never a game under his watch where the police were summoned to the field to break up on-field altercations, something that happened more than once under the most recent coach’s watch.


Mark Deans


Sherman