It took me 26 years to learn to make yogurt and that is probably because I decided to learn it this year. Perhaps it sounds frivolous and difficult to learn, but it doesn’t have to be so. It is a recipe of dedication but honestly it’s easy once learned.

It took me 26 years to learn to make yogurt and that is probably because I decided to learn it this year. Perhaps it sounds frivolous and difficult to learn, but it doesn’t have to be so. It is a recipe of dedication but honestly it’s easy once learned.


Yogurt is a popular and ancient food filled with health benefits. A traditional food, ancients relished yogurt because it’s easier to digest than milk. Frozen yogurt is a satisfying alternative to ice cream. I don’t care to replace ice cream, but I do like yogurt. It improves the "intestinal cultural ecology…restore[s] the damage [antibiotic] drugs cause in the digestive tract, is extremely high in calcium and confer[s] many other health benefits," writes Sandor Katz, author of "Wild Fermentations," my bible on culturing food. Susan S. Weed, author of "Breast Cancer? Breast Health! The Wise Woman Way," says, "Yogurt is especially recommended for those at high risk of cancer, as it is superb at blocking cellular changes that initiate the cancer cascade."


The process for making yogurt is simple. You will need a one-quart container, a cooler, a quart of milk and a tablespoon of plain, live cultured yogurt. One quart is about four cups of milk. Preheat the container. You can put it in a pot of water and warm it. I heat my mason jars in an electric oven for 10 minutes.


Heat the milk until before it boils, when little bubbles appear at the edge — between 170° and 185° F. Let it cool to slightly above body temperature — preferably 120° to 100° F or if it’s not hot to the touch of a clean finger. Once cool, mix one tablespoon of plain yogurt per quart. Place it in the warmed container — I use a mason jar but you can be creative and use an old tub of yogurt. Then insulate the yogurt for a few hours while it solidifies. I put my jar into a cooler and surround it with dishtowels. Put it where it won’t be jostled and in a few hours you will have yogurt. Your next batch can be made from a tablespoon of your first batch.


Now I have come a long way learning my own best technique. Once I poured the milk into a hot jar just removed from the oven. I cracked the jar and ended up with milk everywhere.



Happy birthday Monday to Larry Vincent, Bobbie Dacus, Linda Bryant and Billy Malverne all of Denison; Bishop Charles Brown, Patty Harvey, D.J. Brown, Patricia Harvey, Daisey Mae Jackson, Tozorian Smith and Jack Hicks, all of Sherman; Brandy Walthall of Bells.


Happy anniversary Monday to James and Jennie Shockley of Bonham, 54 years.