My niece and I made a wreath recently, and it opened my eyes to what holiday decorating at our house may be like in the future. For years now, I have been the chief elf at our house.

My niece and I made a wreath recently, and it opened my eyes to what holiday decorating at our house may be like in the future. For years now, I have been the chief elf at our house.


I feel that baton getting ready for the pass. Though only 5 years old, my niece already has definite tastes in some things. One of them, apparently, is decorating. I thought the wreath making would be a fun way to kill some time together. I put out a few little items and some ribbon. She gave them a nod of disapproval. Surly, she said, I had better ribbon than that. How about something in red (her favorite color). So I found some red ribbon.


When I offered her tiny little ornaments, she opted for the bigger ones in the box. When I suggested attaching the bow in one way, she countered with another. Still we worked together pretty well for quite sometime and the wreath was taking on a personality all its own. Then she pulled out a piece of ribbon, handed it to me and said, "show me how to make a wreath out of this."


I told her I couldn’t make a wreath out of the ribbon. I said I could show her how to use the ribbon to decorate the wreath or to attach other things to the wreath.


She looked at me like I had just said, "I don’t know how to tie my shoes." So I asked her to show me what she meant. She replied if she could show me, she wouldn’t need my help.


Good point. After many different exchanges, I began to see real tears rolling down her little face. We sat down on the couch and I tried to explain that I had meant the project to be fun and she didn’t need to take it so seriously. She said she wanted it "to be perfect for grandma."


So we sat there working at it a while and soon she had attached a number of tiny ornaments to the ribbon and attached ribbon to the bow so that it hung a bit like a tear drop from the top of the bow. Suddenly the storm clouds lifted and the little face lit up like the sun.


"It is perfect," she announced. And, when I stepped back from it, I realized it was perfect. Its perfection didn’t rest it its artistry or symmetry, but in the creator’s desire to please someone else. Still, I think I will get the lights up on the house before she visits the next time. Somethings just don’t lend themselves to perfectionism.



Happy birthday Monday to Melvin Briggs, Paul Root and Jessica Hudson Adams, all of Sherman; Stephen Sparkman, Suzette Smith, Richard Berry and Winona Bishop, all of Denison; Melva Hignight Shugart of Yantis, Texas; Christina Flaherty of Dallas; Jesse Neal of Bells; Janet Weightman of Southmayd.


Happy anniversary Monday to Randy and Debra Clark of Sherman, 34 years.