For places like North Texas, which only sees ice a few times a year, having expensive plows and deicing equipment doesn’t make a lot of sense financially speaking, but maybe deicing materials don’t have to be quite so expensive — at least in some places where alternative measures are available.

For places like North Texas, which only sees ice a few times a year, having expensive plows and deicing equipment doesn’t make a lot of sense financially speaking, but maybe deicing materials don’t have to be quite so expensive — at least in some places where alternative measures are available.


Of course there is salt, which works with temperatures above 15 degrees but it can negatively impact aquatic life and vegetation when it runs off the road. Do you know what the solution to this problem is?


Sugar beet juice, says an article from National Geographic. Mixing the salt with the juices, says the article, create a "goo" to minimize runoff. Molasses and waste from beer making can also have the same effect, but I would think those two solutions would be problematic. "But officer it’s the deicer!" And can you image trying to wash molasses off your car?


There is the ever-trusty chemical route. The solution can actually block ice from forming at temperatures as low as minus 75 degrees.


If it’s minus 75 degrees outside I think it might be a non-issue. Personally, I draw the line on outdoor activities somewhere around 0, definitely well north of -75. Do thermometers in North Texas even measure temperatures that cold? In my mind I see the glass imploding — the opposite of the explosion you see when a cartoon character has a fever.


So that brings me to pickle brine. (Admittedly that’s a bit of a non sequitur but pickle juice is the next deicing agent on the list.) National Geographic says that New Jersey is already experimenting with the stuff. It works similarly to rock salt but at lower temperatures and is more environmentally friendly, because it lowers the amount of chloride released into the environment. I think the sandwich lobby would be in favor of the pickle option too, or is it only me that craves a deli sandwich when they smell pickles?


Finally there is cheese brine, which is actually being used in Wisconsin. No surprise there. "The downside is the threat of unwanted ‘stinky cheese’ odor, but so far residents have not complained," says National Geographic.



Happy birthday Monday to Richey Rivers, Judy John, Kira Rockins and Philip Schuster, all of Sherman; Tanner Lee Thornton and Cooper T. Dobbs, both of Pottsboro; Margaret Fralicks of Savoy; John Steven Stuebinger of Paris; Samuel Jerideau of Dallas; and Ashley Calhoun.