Most of the time, the lists that plague the Internet and social media sites don’t hold a lot of interest for me, but a recent one did catch my eye: "50 Books You’ll Never Read The Same Way Again." I won’t recount the entire list, but here are a few highlights that caught my eye, mostly because I’ve read and loved these books. (If you want to read the list visit http://bzfd.it/1dq9cb4.)

Most of the time, the lists that plague the Internet and social media sites don’t hold a lot of interest for me, but a recent one did catch my eye: "50 Books You’ll Never Read The Same Way Again." I won’t recount the entire list, but here are a few highlights that caught my eye, mostly because I’ve read and loved these books. (If you want to read the list visit http://bzfd.it/1dq9cb4.)


First there’s the story of the mischievous monkey named Curious George. In 1940, the creators of this character, Margaret and H.A. Rey, fled Paris ahead of the Nazis on bicycles they had built from spare parts.


The couple had begun work on their book in 1939. The monkey was originally called Fifi and the Reys had received a cash advance from a French publisher to write "The Adventures of Fifi." That money helped them escape.


They wrote eight "Curious George" books before Hans died in 1977 and Margret in 1996. Later books were created by authors and illustrators imitating the Reys’ style. Imagine if this couple had not escaped Paris. They were German-born Jews who became Brazilian citizens while living there in the 1930s.


The citizenship too, played a role in their escape, because it made it easier for them to get visas, says a 2005 New York Times article. Without this couple children worldwide would not know about the monkey who floats away holding on to a bunch of balloons or joins a circus only to get fired and then rehired after rescuing an escaped bear that climbs a tree. Without Curious George what would Forrest Gump’s favorite book be?


The other item on the list I’d like to share is this: J.R.R. Tolkien, famous for writing "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" typed the epic story using a typewriter and two fingers. It took him 14 years, he told the New York Times in an interview in 1967. I can’t image working on a project that long or that slowly.



Happy birthday Tuesday to Norma Hintz of Denison; Adrian Stevenson and Unne Hughley, both of Sherman; Nelda Phipps Bauer of Saint Cloud, Fla.; Bonita Meeks of Whitesboro; Emily Stevenson of Tom Bean; Otis Bass of Bells; Adrianna Milner of Cleveland, Ga.


Happy anniversary Tuesday to Wayman and Betty Chilcutt of Whitesboro, 63 years; Mike and Gay Ritchie of Denison, 50 years; Larry and Angela Hughley of Sherman, 9 years; Todd and Jessica Bass of Bells.