1. The biggest challenge facing Grayson County is attracting the industry and commerce needed to provide the great jobs and tax base that once allowed Grayson County to flourish as an independent metropolitan area with its own exceptional quality of life. We can’t allow our destiny to become a less affluent version of the bedroom communities that surround the Metroplex. I want Grayson County to be a place where my children can find great paying jobs and careers without having to move elsewhere. Great local jobs and an expanded tax base to affordably sustain needed county services must be the top priority of the next county judge.

1. The biggest challenge facing Grayson County is attracting the industry and commerce needed to provide the great jobs and tax base that once allowed Grayson County to flourish as an independent metropolitan area with its own exceptional quality of life. We can’t allow our destiny to become a less affluent version of the bedroom communities that surround the Metroplex. I want Grayson County to be a place where my children can find great paying jobs and careers without having to move elsewhere. Great local jobs and an expanded tax base to affordably sustain needed county services must be the top priority of the next county judge.


My plan for attracting good jobs and growing the tax base includes the following: (1) Pass a conservative, balanced budget that keeps taxes low and reduces government debt and waste. (2) Cut government regulations to make it easier for companies to relocate to Grayson County and hire more local employees. (3) Identify businesses that are likely targets for relocation and use our God-given resources of fresh air, plentiful water and hardworking people to attract them to Grayson County. (4) Continue to build on the local infrastructure necessary to support a growing economy such as Panda Energy and obtaining an interstate highway designation for U.S. 75. (5) Protect our traditions, values and quality of life from attack by outsiders.


2. The Texas Constitution creates the office of county judge. Except for handling uncontested probate matters, the position is more like a mayor than a judge. It does not require a law degree. The county judge presides over a five member commissioners court which has budgetary and administrative authority over county government operations. However, unlike a mayor who may have direct or indirect authority over department heads, a county judge has no authority over other elected county officials such as the county clerk, sheriff or district attorney.


In order to be effective, a county judge must be a consensus builder. This requires vision, leadership and a determination to get things done. The county judge is in a unique position to unite the cities, school districts, rural areas and others within the county to work for the common good. As a three-term mayor of Sherman, I demonstrated the ability to unite the different perspectives within the city to work together. I can do the same at the county level. As the Metroplex knocks at our south border, we will either defend our quality of life collectively, or it will be taken from us separately.


My education, training and experience uniquely qualify me to serve as county judge. I am a graduate of Sherman High School and earned a bachelor’s degree from Austin College while playing on a national championship football team. After receiving my bachelor’s degree, I obtained an MBA. I have held positions with major corporations and started my own. I served as director of operations for Echosphere Corporation (DISH network) in the western United States. I have experience working in international business in both the northern and southern hemisphere of the Americas. In 1992, I returned home to start my first business and care for my aging mother. Since then I have launched, built, turned-around, managed and, in some cases, sold successful, profitable companies. One of these is the Montessori Academy of North Texas, which my wife Angela and I own, and Angela operates on a day to day basis. My business experience has taught me that the difference between success and failure in business often depends on loyal, hardworking employees. They are the greatest asset of any service business, and service plays a key role in county government.


Finally, my father died when I was 12 years old. From that time forward I was raised by a single, working mother. She taught me the lessons of hard work, persistence and faith. My mother bought me a lawn mower, and I was required to mow our yard for free, but I could keep whatever else I earned from mowing the yards of our neighbors. At that moment I became an entrepreneur and, although I didn’t know it at age 12, a Republican.


The life lessons of my childhood will serve me well as county judge, maybe more so than my college degrees. Working together we can renew the prosperity Grayson County once enjoyed and protect our unique quality of life for the next generation.