A few phone scams have recently been reported in Grayson County. There are certain measures everyone can take to prevent themselves from falling victim to a phone scam.

A few phone scams have recently been reported in Grayson County. There are certain measures everyone can take to prevent themselves from falling victim to a phone scam.


The Grayson County Sheriff’s Office warned residents last month in a written release of a phone scam that had been reported multiple times. According to the release, the caller identified himself as a sergeant or lieutenant with the Sheriff’s Office or police department. The caller told victims they missed jury duty and were facing jail time unless they paid a fine. The caller asked victims to get $2,000 in prepaid debit cards, and then asked for the card’s code in order to gain access to the money.


The Sherman Police Department recently issued a written release about another phone scam in which an 80-year-old victim had received a phone call from a man claiming to be "Michael Anderson." The man told the victim she had won $2.5 million, and that the victim had to send him money to be eligible to collect the $2.5 million. The victim bought prepaid MasterCards, Visa cards and MoneyGrams, and sent them to places in Florida and Jamaica. The victim was scammed out of several thousands of dollars. It appears that the phone call may have originated from Jamaica.


Hampton said residents should apply common sense to any call that claims you are the winner of a large sum of money. "If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is," he said.


Denison PD Lt. Mike Eppler advised to never give out personal information over the phone, and to never send an unknown person money. Giving out information like social security numbers and bank account numbers could lead to identity theft.


Hampton stressed the importance of always reporting a call you suspect to be a scam. Many people who become victims of a scam do not report it, possibly because they are embarrassed, he said.


When a scam call is reported, police will try to track where the call came from, Hampton said. Depending on where the call originated, police may hand the investigation over to another law enforcement agency.


According to Eppler, an identity theft case will be investigated in the area that the suspect committed the identity theft. If a Denison resident has their identity stolen in Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma City police will investigate the crime


Many phone scam calls originate overseas, in which case it becomes harder to investigate. If the suspect is operating from a foreign country, the victim may never be able to get back the money they were scammed out of.


While the police department will try to help victims in phone scam cases, people also need to be responsible for their own actions, Hampton said.