Vehicles lined up in lengthy queues at stop signs and traffic lights around Texoma’s retail stores on Black Friday. Bargain-hunting shoppers waded through large crowds and stood in long lines to get the special deals offered by most retailers to kick off the holiday shopping season.

Vehicles lined up in lengthy queues at stop signs and traffic lights around Texoma’s retail stores on Black Friday. Bargain-hunting shoppers waded through large crowds and stood in long lines to get the special deals offered by most retailers to kick off the holiday shopping season.


According to the Pew Research Center, more Americans plan on shopping over the Internet this year than in 2012. The Center also reported that consumers plan to spend less on holiday shopping this year than last, and 50 percent of American "say they dread holiday shopping."


Families ranging from affectionate newlyweds to grandparents with excited young ones turned out for sales events at retail stores across Texoma on Friday. Many Texomans said they just came out on Black Friday to browse the sales at brick-and-mortar stores.


Matthew Stufflebeme of Trenton said he drove to Sherman to check out the deals on new flat-screen televisions. "My wife’s birthday is tomorrow," Stufflebeme said, "otherwise I wouldn’t be out here."


Stufflebeme said he would probably spend more on Christmas gifts this year because "prices have gone up a bit." Stufflebeme said traffic wasn’t as bad as he expected: "It’s alright, as long as people pay attention."


Colton Blount, a native of Sherman who is home for the holidays from the University of North Texas, browsed laptop computers with fellow Sherman-born student, Jordan Hancock, who studies at Texas A&M University.


"He wanted to go," Hancock said. "I’ll probably be looking online, because I’m lazy."


Blount said, "I just wanted to come out and find some stuff. I’ll probably do a lot of shopping online on Cyber Monday, but this is the first store we’ve been to so we’ll see."


Connie Baugh of Calera, Okla. went shopping at stores around Sherman with her children and grandchildren, and she said the multigenerational trek was more than worth it. "We have found some amazing deals," she said. "We’ve done some great shopping. So far, I’ve spent less but gotten more, but we’re not done yet."


Baugh said she planned on doing more shopping online on Monday.


The increase in honking horns and impatient shoppers on Friday didn’t seem to put many consumers in too dark of a mood. Several people scanned the aisle shelves with cellphones in hand, repeating product names to remote shoppers. More than one exasperated family patriarch could be spotted, and one daughter was overheard asking her father, "If you hate it so much, why did you even come?"


"To keep your mother under control," the man jokingly replied, drawing a laugh from his teenage daughter and her male companion.


Charles Leslie, a student at Texas A&M University - Commerce, was back in his hometown of Sherman for the holidays and went shopping with his friend Greg Jackson, a student at Southeastern Oklahoma State University.


Leslie said he only went shopping on Friday, "to see some good deals, whatever catches my eye. I’ll probably look online though, that might be the best way to go."


Jackson said he saw some good sale prices, but "I just hate the lines. It’s not as bad as it has been since some of them started at 6."


Madison Craig and Kelsey Jarvis, Sherman High School seniors, said on Friday afternoon they had been out shopping since 6 a.m.


"It’s kind of a thrill," Jarvis said, "kind of like a festivity. It got packed real quick." Jarvis said she spent much more this year than in 2012, but, she said, the deals were irresistible.


Craig said the only reason she came out was "for cheaper prices," and laughed. Both women said they planned on doing the majority of their shopping online.


Although the origin of the name "Black Friday" is somewhat controversial, many shoppers associate the moniker with the negativity that often surrounds the kickoff of the shopping season. Craig and Jarvis each provided their own darkly humorous etymology of the term.


"I guess it symbolizes death," Jarvis said.


Craig said, "It’s kind of like suicide to come out shopping today. It’s like the black plague of shopping," but both young women laughed at the idea.