State officials, Texoma governments, and regional infrastructure developers are expecting 2014 and the following few years to set the stage for more than $6 billion in water management projects in the area, according to the Texas Water Development Board’s 2012 State Water Plan.

State officials, Texoma governments, and regional infrastructure developers are expecting 2014 and the following few years to set the stage for more than $6 billion in water management projects in the area, according to the Texas Water Development Board’s 2012 State Water Plan.


The TWDB says on its website, "At the end of each five-year regional water planning cycle, agency staff compiles information from the approved regional water plans and other sources to develop the state water plan."


Grayson and Fannin counties fall within the state’s Region C water planning region. According to the TWDB’s five-year plan, the population of Region C is expected to almost double (96 percent increase) by the year 2060. The total demand for water in the region is expected to increase by 86 percent.


Most of the regional increase in water demand will come from municipalities like city and county governments, the report indicates.


The water development board plans to encourage conservation strategies to "account for approximately 12 percent" of the total volume of water needed over the next five decades.


Greater Texoma Utility Authority Consulting Manager Jerry Chapman was part of the consortium from Region C that produced the regional water plan accepted by the TWDB as part of the 2012 state water plan.


GTUA General Manager Drew Satterwhite said at the authority’s last meeting that Satterwhite was officially appointed to take Chapman’s place on the Region C planning board since Chapman is retiring.


The GTUA will be one important cog in the implementation of the billion-dollar water projects around the region. Since Texas voters approved Proposition 6 on the November ballot, the state is in the process of creating a low-interest revolving fund that will make capital available at abnormally low interest rates to water infrastructure developers.


TWDB says in its report that although the region’s population is increasing overall, not every county will experience growth because most migration is towards urban areas.


Grayson and Fannin Counties both expect increased population in the coming decades, and local governments around the region are already dealing with current or future water infrastructure challenges.


As the region’s shifting population complicates adequate water delivery, Texas’ governments and residents will look to conservation measures and ramped-up infrastructure to avert water shortages and mitigate the state’s chronic drought.