If any Shermanites noticed a different flavor in their tap water to start the week, it was not without reason. The City has temporarily switched to 100 percent well water to meet the needs of citizens, as the pipeline connecting the City with Lake Texoma was shut down Monday for the first day of construction that is scheduled to last through mid-February.

If any Shermanites noticed a different flavor in their tap water to start the week, it was not without reason. The City has temporarily switched to 100 percent well water to meet the needs of citizens, as the pipeline connecting the City with Lake Texoma was shut down Monday for the first day of construction that is scheduled to last through mid-February.


Employees at the City’s water treatment plant located near Grayson College explained that the 72-inch pipeline is emptied for maintenance every year, but usually only for a few days at a time. The difference this year is a work project at the point where the pipeline crosses the Union Pacific railway east of Pottsboro.


Sherman Mayor Cary Wacker said during the city’s last council meeting that the construction is expected wrap by Feb. 10. Until that time, town water will be drawn exclusively from the Woodbine and Trinity aquifers, which are water-saturated strata of rock located below Texoma.


Before the pipeline was built through the efforts of former Mayor David Sprowl and others, the city relied entirely upon its few dozen wells drilled into the aquifers — a reliance that frequently led to shortages and rationing. Once the pipeline came online, it allowed the city to shutter many of those wells, fulfilling about half of its yearly water needs through the lake instead.