The Sherman Planning and Zoning Commission on Tuesday declined to grant a request by a private property owner to build a security fence around a proposed downtown recycling center in Sherman. The owner, Abdel Laktiri, said placing the fence around the edge of the property rather than set back the required 10-feet from the street was necessary due to the location of a truck scale that would be instrumental to the operation of the center. Commission Chair Don Hicks suggested it would be preferrable from his point of view for Laktiri to find a way to move the massive, in-ground scale rather than grant a variance allowing him to build a fence enclosing the structure.

The Sherman Planning and Zoning Commission on Tuesday declined to grant a request by a private property owner to build a security fence around a proposed downtown recycling center in Sherman. The owner, Abdel Laktiri, said placing the fence around the edge of the property rather than set back the required 10-feet from the street was necessary due to the location of a truck scale that would be instrumental to the operation of the center. Commission Chair Don Hicks suggested it would be preferrable from his point of view for Laktiri to find a way to move the massive, in-ground scale rather than grant a variance allowing him to build a fence enclosing the structure.


The lot in question sits on the 400 block of Odneal Street in a heavily industrial area of downtown Sherman, flanked to the north and south by aged grain elevators. Commission members declined to allow Laktiri to put the property to beneficial use, and instead asked that he develop a different plan and return to the Commission at a later date.


Commission members also denied a request by a hopeful homeowner seeking to build a house on the 2500 block of Silverado Trail, citing a neighbor’s desire for consistency on the street. The lot owners were hoping to receive a variance allowing them to build an attached garage 15-feet from the curb instead of the required 25-feet, as the small property backs up to a retention pond. Two neighbors demurred, saying that the variance would compromise the homogeneity of the street.


Three Commission members agreed that the neighbors’ concern was a more valid interest than the private property owners’ ability to develop their land. Commissioner Alan Scheibmeir voted to allow the house to be build as designed, citing the city’s eventual increased property tax receipts, while Hicks decided not to vote after seeing how other members came down on the issue.


In other business, Commission members granted a specific use permit to C&L Natural Stone for its proposed relocation. The business, which is currently found at the intersection of Texoma Pkwy. and Highway 691, is moving farther south on Texoma to gain access to more room for stone storage and bulk building materials.


Other matters discussed by the Commission included allowing a temporary gravel drive to access an oil well on the 4200 block of Travis Street; allowing an 8-foot backyard fence for a home on the 2600 block of Riata Drive; and granting a zoning change for a property on the 100 block of Mission Drive from Single-Family Agricultural to General Commercial, including grandfathering the architecture of current buildings at the location.