The Sherman City Council adopted a revised Official Zoning Map on Monday night, solidifying aggregate changes to the document that have accrued through previous Council action over the previous 12 years. The last time the Council approved the map was 2002.

The Sherman City Council adopted a revised Official Zoning Map on Monday night, solidifying aggregate changes to the document that have accrued through previous Council action over the previous 12 years. The last time the Council approved the map was 2002.


"This is just an update of all the changes that have been made … that have gone through the zoning and City Council process," said Director of Developmental Services Scott Shadden. "(It includes the Highway) 289, Highway 82 annexations, out that way."


The most recent among the dozens of changes reflected in the new map was a change in zoning for a home-turned-business-turned-home-again on the 800 block of Travis Street. The change was previously approved unanimously by the city’s Planning and Zoning Commission, and was rubber-stamped by the Council on Monday.


In other business, the Council approved a semantic change to the guidelines governing its Residential Tax Abatement program. The program, which promotes development in certain areas of the city and was renewed for two years last April, was changed to remove the word "modernization" from the guidelines, as city staff said they are not equipped for the type of assessment required to value such improvements.


"We figured out that our ability to actually administer and look after that part of the program was nearly impossible," said Assistant City Manager Robby Hefton. "We’re still encouraging folks to invest and reinvest in those parts of town that are possibly distressed, but it would limit it to new structures and additions to properties."


Mayor Cary Wacker made a presentation to the Council regarding its participation in the TEX-21 U.S. 75/69 Corridor Task Force. The group’s goal is to attain "high priority" corridor designation from the United States Department of Transportation, making the highway’s upkeep a federal-funding priority. Wacker serves as the city’s primary representative on the task force, which costs the city $4,250 annually.


"This is really an advocacy group for us, so our main focus is continuing to stay connected to those cities that are working toward (the designation)," said Wacker. "We are the access point for a great deal of traffic, … so I think it’s very important that, at least for now, we stay as a voice in that group."


After Wacker’s presentation, the Council voted to continue the city’s participation in the task force.


Sherman Economic Development Corp. Board Vice Chairman Brooks Hull and President Scott Connell delivered the organization’s quarterly update to the Council, focusing on the group’s efforts at Progress Park to augment infrastructure.


"We’re taking on the developer’s prospective, … and that is to make sure that we have, not just the current utilities, … but we’re also looking at adjacent properties; how we can serve the long term needs of that area and support existing industry that’s already there," said Connell. "(We’re working to) replace some of the systems that have been there for a long period of time and have supported some of our largest employers in this market."


Wacker ended the meeting by noting that the city’s water pipeline to Lake Texoma will be out of service from Jan. 13 until Feb. 10. The city will rely exclusively upon its groundwater wells while the pipeline is down.


The meeting was adjourned at 5:37 p.m.