POTTSBORO — After the school bell rings and classes let out for the day, many Pottsboro students make use of local after-school care for activities and homework help. Thanks to a move to a larger facility, the Pottsboro Kids Club hopes to expand and offer services to more students.

POTTSBORO — After the school bell rings and classes let out for the day, many Pottsboro students make use of local after-school care for activities and homework help. Thanks to a move to a larger facility, the Pottsboro Kids Club hopes to expand and offer services to more students.


The Pottsboro Kids Club recently moved from its location at Pottsboro’s town hall building on Franklin Street, which also houses a senior center, the Pottsboro Police Department, and the local Lion’s Club, to the Pottsboro ISD administrative office on Cardinal Lane. The move is a part of an alliance between the school district and the nonprofit organization that offers affordable, alternative after-school care for Pottsboro students.


The Pottsboro Kids Club, which originated in 2003 as a joint venture between the Salvation Army and the City of Pottsboro, offers after-school activities and summer programs to Pottsboro students from kindergarten to sixth grade. The idea developed when, current-Mayor Frank Budra, was serving as municipal judge and many juveniles would repeatedly appear in his courtroom.


"We have a lot of latch-key kids," said Budra.


"They simply had nothing to do," he said, referring to the fact that there were no after school programs in the city.


As a child, Budra had a similar program in his home town which he attended. The program helped shape who he is and benefited him in the future, he said.


"These are the citizens of tomorrow," he said.


In 2005, the organization separated from the Salvation Army, making it the only independent after-school club in Grayson County, said Bobby Hancock, board member for the Pottsboro Kids Club and president of the Pottsboro Chamber of Commerce.


The new headquarters, which gives the organization access to four large classroom-style rooms and to a gymnasium, is a part of the Pottsboro ISD administration facility. Hancock hopes this will allow for a more hands-on approach to assisting students with classwork from both teachers and high school volunteer tutors.


"It will allow a teacher to come over to the building after class," said Hancock. "It is like being on campus."


In addition, the move to ISD facilities will reduce transportation needs for the organization.


The Kids Club, which currently serves about 40 students, hopes that the new building will allow it to serve as many as 90 students in the future, said Hancock.


"It is so big and has so much room to grow," Club Director Judy Nolen said.


Since its move in August, enrollment has remained mostly unchanged, but Cindy Bunch, president of the Pottsboro Kids Club board, believes it is still a "work in progress".


"We didn’t expect miracles overnight," said Bunch.