Officials with US Aviation held a public town hall meeting Tuesday to give an update on its bid for a contract for initial flight training for U.S. Air Force pilots. Officials said the flight school will be placing its bid for the contract, which would return military training to North Texas Regional Airport— Perrin Field, by June 30.

Officials with US Aviation held a public town hall meeting Tuesday to give an update on its bid for a contract for initial flight training for U.S. Air Force pilots. Officials said the flight school will be placing its bid for the contract, which would return military training to North Texas Regional Airport— Perrin Field, by June 30.


Here is a look at the contract, by the numbers:


$250 million - $290 million: The estimated value of the contract with the U.S. Air Force and Department of Defense for initial flight training over the course of 10 years. US Aviation Vice President Mark Taylor said the final value of the contract will be determined by the number of students who go through the 30- to 60-day program.


1,500-1,950: The number of students that will go through the program each year. The average class size is expected to range from 130 to 210 students.


$25 million - $32 million: The estimated economic investment US Aviation will be making for the program. This includes the costs of 50 to 60 new aircraft and the construction of a 200 room dormitory to house the trainee pilots.


10: The number of years for the contract.


120-160: The number of full-time-equivalent jobs that will be created by the program. Many of these positions, including 50 new flight instructors starting at $50 an hour and 15 mechanics starting at $30 an hour, will come with above average wages, Taylor said.


40,000: The estimated number of additional flight hours that will be generated at NTRA through the contract each year. This would result from an estimated 50,000 operations conducted at the airport. Taylor said this extra activity could help NTRA secure funding from the Federal Aviation Administration for its control tower operations.


18 months: The time US Aviation will have to prepare for service once the contract is awarded. Taylor said it could take the Department of Defence six months to decide the winner of the contract, and appeals could take an additional six months.