In a special session on Monday, the Grayson County Commissioners Court submitted the finalized results for the Nov. 5 election, which included nine constitutional amendments.

In a special session on Monday, the Grayson County Commissioners Court submitted the finalized results for the Nov. 5 election, which included nine constitutional amendments.


The total includes four provisional votes that had to be verified before they were included in the final results.


According to the final results for Grayson County, Proposition 1, which provides property tax exemptions for residential homesteads, received 4,655 votes for and 613 votes against.


Proposition 2, which repealed obsolete provisions for a State Medical Board, received 4,684 votes for and 546 votes against.


Proposition 3, which amended rules on property taxes on freeport goods, received 3,221 votes for and 1,908 votes against.


Proposition 4, which authorized property tax exemptions for disabled veterans, received 4,503 votes for and 739 against.


Proposition 5, which allows for reverse mortgages on homestead properties, received 3,413 votes for and 1,757 against.


Proposition 6 allows for the creation of the State Water Implementation Fund for Texas to help finance state water plan projects. The measure received 3,604 votes for and 1,658 votes against.


Proposition 7 allows for home-rule municipalities to fill vacancies in their governing bodies in the event of an unexpired term. The proposition received 3,858 for and 1,300 against.


Proposition 8 repealed a measure that would create a hospital district in Hidalgo County. It received 3,638 votes for and 1,291 against.


Proposition 9 expanded the types of sanctions that can be placed against a judge or justice following a formal proceeding. It received 4,535 votes for and 621 against.


The November election also saw the debut of the Countywide Polling Place Program in Grayson county. The program, which had a limited start in 2006, allows a voter to use any county polling place, rather than reporting a specific precinct’s polling place, similar to early voting.


The program also allowed Grayson County to condense and eliminate some polling places, reducing the number from 36 to 22.


Since the limited launch of the program, more counties have been gradually added. Grayson County chose to use the November election to implement the program due to a history of low voter turnout during constitutional elections, Grayson County Elections Administrator Deana Patterson said.


She said the transition was smooth and did not have any major problems.


"It was very successful," she said.