The Denison City Council approved an ordinance on Monday, calling for a general and special election in May, which will see three Council positions up for election.

The Denison City Council approved an ordinance on Monday, calling for a general and special election in May, which will see three Council positions up for election.


The city will hold a special election to Council Place 1, left vacant by the resignation of Council member Matt Hanley last month. Hanley, who is looking to move to another residence in the city, is expected to run for David Spindle’s Place 5 position, when he reaches the end of his term limit in May, said Denison City Manager Robert Hanna. The Place 5 position, which is at large, would allow Hanley flexibility in his move, said Hanna. Council Place 3, currently held by Ken Brawley, will also be up for election. Candidates wishing to run for the Council positions have until 5 p.m. on March 10 to file to run.


In other business, the Council approved a zone change from Office District to Business Park District for a property at 105 Memorial Dr. The prospective buyer plans on using the former doctor’s office, which also ran billing for the hospital, into the new headquarters for his California-based company that makes locking security straps for boats and other uses. The facility will only be used for assembly, and no manufacturing of parts will be done on the property.


The Council also approved an amendment to the Zoning District Ordinance overseeing the Lakeside Development District, which encompasses the Preston Harbour Development. Hanna said that the minor changes are meant to strengthen and clarify the ordinance, as the development continues near Lake Texoma.


In its final business of the night, the Council received a report regarding the City’s vacation program for city employees and approved a change that would create two new tiers in the vacation system. The change would grant more vacation days to employees who worked for five and 10 years for the city. The aim of the change is to retain long-term employees, and give incentives to stay with the city. The financial impact for the city is minimal, Hanna said.