When the six impaneled members of the newly resurrected Keep Sherman Beautiful commission met for the first time late last year, they realized quickly that the organization needed a new image. The logo used by the commission’s previous iteration, which disbanded in 2007, could politely be described as "corporate."

When the six impaneled members of the newly resurrected Keep Sherman Beautiful commission met for the first time late last year, they realized quickly that the organization needed a new image. The logo used by the commission’s previous iteration, which disbanded in 2007, could politely be described as "corporate."


"It looked like we’re trying to sell people something," said commission Chairwoman Lauren Roth of the old logo, which prominently featured the initials "KSB" in block font. "(The commission is) brand-new to us, because it’s been six years since it’s been active. So we need a new logo, a new face."


To that end, the organization is sponsoring a contest for school-aged children to design a new logo to headline its renewed charter. Submissions are due by the end of the month, and may be submitted at the city library, by email or through the group’s Facebook page.


Sherman Mayor Cary Wacker said she hopes the new logo will highlight the volunteer-led group’s mission.


"My thought (in reestablishing the commission) was that, to get our community looking better, we need community input and we need people who will provide leadership in terms of big-picture projects that will really make a long-term difference," said Wacker. "So when we put the Keep Sherman Beautiful commission back together, we were looking for people who had (experience) in business or leadership in the community who can help bring resources to help accomplish some of their goals."


The City Council began appointing members over the summer, and the group met for the first time in October. Roth and Wacker both emphasized the Council’s deliberate approach to appointing people who could have an impact.


"Currently, it’s just the six member board. Once we get our projects lined out, we’ll put together committees of community members that will help us carry out what’s on the board agenda," said Roth. "(Long term), I would like it to at least be a small office, with one to two people hired full-time that can at least take care of the finances, the admin, the coordination of events, but still be a volunteer-based organization. Obviously, with an organization like this, you need the community backing it; you can’t do it without the support of the community."


That kind of support can’t be ginned up if people don’t know about the opportunities to serve, said Roth. Increasing the commission’s public profile is its initial goal.


"I think that was one of the major problems with Keep Sherman Beautiful originally, is that people just didn’t know about it. So our big thing is awareness," said Roth. "Once we have our logo and we get a kick-off going, and we have more awareness here, we can start listing our projects and applying for grants. We’re trying to find different ways to help beautify Sherman, but also help with recycling, waste management, those kind of things."


The new logo will be unveiled at a community event on April 5. The mayor said she hopes the commission will be able to forge partnerships that will give it the financial and human resources to tackle large-scale improvement projects around town.


"Our goal is to do some projects that really make a noticeable difference in the appearance of Sherman and make people feel good about our city," said Wacker. "It’s not just planting some flowers. It’s really addressing issues that cause blight or things where places in the city look run down. … I think we just recognized that this (commission) is a piece we need to be the kind of community we want to be."