TOKYO — A draft report by a panel studying the genetic testing industry will likely urge companies to obtain certification from international groups such as the International Organization for Standardization, according to sources.

TOKYO — A draft report by a panel studying the genetic testing industry will likely urge companies to obtain certification from international groups such as the International Organization for Standardization, according to sources.


The study group’s draft will also call on companies to disclose the scientific basis for their test results relating to disease risks and other matters. These measures are aimed at guaranteeing the quality of such testing services, the sources said.


The panel has been studying ways to ensure the adequacy of genetic testing services.


The Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry may release the draft report this month, sources said. The panel is expected to continue its work, to compile rules to increase trust in the industry and help the market grow.


The draft report examines the quality of the genetic analyses; the quality of the results, including ensuring they have a scientific basis; and ways to provide users with information on test results and other matters.


To improve the quality of the analyses, the report proposes requiring businesses to obtain international certification.


To ensure users enter into the tests with sufficient knowledge, the report sets a course for the creation of rules for these businesses. It states "it is important to show good faith" in disclosing matters such as the scientific grounds upon which work is based, and the limitations inherent in predictions of disease risk.


However, views were split on how to improve the quality of results.


Some on the panel felt a third-party organization should be established to evaluate businesses, while others called for a voluntary framework, saying a third-party evaluation system would involve financial and other obstacles.


The draft also notes the economic burden of requiring companies to obtain international certification, saying that for now, priority should be given to voluntary rules established by the industry.


Opinions also differed regarding legal provisions, with some saying regulations are needed to ensure that rules are followed, while others said this would be a drag on market growth.


The panel’s report is expected to be the first step toward standardizing an industry still in its infancy.


While the government hopes that rules will increase trust in the industry and contribute to its growth, there are many issues to resolve in striking the correct balance between encouraging growth and protecting consumers.