It’s mid-November and the leaves are changing colors and starting to fall all around Texas, Oklahoma and the southern U.S.

It’s mid-November and the leaves are changing colors and starting to fall all around Texas, Oklahoma and the southern U.S.


And while the autumn attention of most outdoorsmen in these regions is situated around college football, deer hunting, and duck hunting, for the angler willing to launch the bass boat another time or two, it’s also one of the best times of the year to go fishing.


So says Major League Fishing pro Timmy Horton of Muscle Shoals, Ala.


"When the leaves begin to fall and the cold winds start to blow in November, crankbaiting can get hot, especially on southern lakes," said Horton, a Duckett Fishing rods pro-staff member. "I like to throw cranks that dive (down) to six to eight feet in November."


Where should an angler look to throw these lures?


"Look for bass in the main creeks that feed into the lake," said Horton, a pro-staff angler for Yum, Bomber, XCalibur, Lew’s and Bass Pro Shops. "Focus on turns in the creek channel where the bank is steep with blowdowns, stumps, or big rocks for structure."


While it’s tough to do so with a $5, $10, or $15 crankbait, the host of "Timmy Horton Outdoors" says that it’s important to make contact with objects in the water.


"It’s important to bounce the baits off the structure," said Horton.


Why is that? Because when the crankbait deflects, it will produce a reaction strike from a hungry largemouth, smallmouth, or spotted bass feeding up for the coming of winter.


"November cranking can produce plenty of action that will make you forget about the cold weather," said Horton, the 2000 B.A.S.S. Angler of the Year.


And that bass catching action is plenty of reason to bundle up, to leave the deer hunting alone for a day or two, and to listen to the football game — in Horton’s case, the Auburn Tigers — on the radio.


Why? Because late fall crankbait fishing can simply be some of the best bass fishing action of the year.