If the thought of Thin Mints makes you salivate like Pavlov’s dog, this is your warning: the bell is about to ring. Girl Scout Cookie season is upon us.

If the thought of Thin Mints makes you salivate like Pavlov’s dog, this is your warning: the bell is about to ring. Girl Scout Cookie season is upon us.


And if that news alone isn’t enough to get your stomach growling, add "instant gratification" to the list of reasons your will power doesn’t stand a chance. Due to a change in policy, the Girl Scouts of Northeast Texas will have cookies in their hands on Sunday — no pre-order required.


"We are allowing the girls to have cookies on hand for the first day … and this way girls can build their skills with people, and collect money and grow and improve their customer service skills a lot faster," said GSNT spokeswoman Elizabeth Zamora. "And consumers can get their cookies quicker and get as many cookies as they want, which is always fun."


Fun for taste buds, at least. And fun for Sherman’s Troop 7621, which met at Wakefield Elementary School Thursday night. The group of eight girls crafted their entrepreneurship badges and mapped out their game plan to have the town canvassed with Tagalongs and Trefoils in short order.


"(Each girl) ranges in initial order anywhere between 100 and 250 boxes. That doesn’t even account for the booth sales that are going to be starting later in January and into February," said Troop Leader Tracey Krider, who emphasised that the program is about more than just doe-eyed youngsters hawking confections. "We talk about what it is to be an entrepreneur. I use that and focus their cookie sales as their own little business. We talk about marketing and advertisement, and how you would get your sales off the ground."


Girl Scouts officials stressed that the annual cookie sale, which will continue through mid-February, isn’t simply a fundraiser, either. Troop leaders use the opportunity to drive home ideals they hope will provide the ingredients for a recipe of success as the girls mature.


"They receive a lot of money for the troops, and they also donate a percentage of the money that they receive for cookies to an organization the girls select, so it’s kind of giving back as well," said Zamora. "And through our cookie program that we have each year, it really allows them to gain experience in … key skills which will help them in their career, in their education, and beyond that."


For Krider, the proof is in the pudding — or Samoas, as it were.


"I was a Girl Scout in my younger days, and I don’t think I’d be the person I am today if it wasn’t for Girl Scouts," said Krider, in her second year as troop leader. "Being in Girl Scouts, it teaches them customer service; it teaches them how to talk to people in public … and to be a salesperson."


"It’s made me take more ownership of what I do," said Krider, of her experience in the program. "The path that I have gone through in my life with the jobs that I have acquired — I certainly don’t think I would have been as outspoken as I am if it wasn’t for Girl Scouts."