On Tuesday night, Denison Superintendent Henry Scott presented School District plans for rebalancing elementary school boundaries within the District for the 2014-15 school year. This was the third in a series of six meetings at District elementary schools held to discuss the plans and get feedback from the community. About ten people were in attendance.

On Tuesday night, Denison Superintendent Henry Scott presented School District plans for rebalancing elementary school boundaries within the District for the 2014-15 school year. This was the third in a series of six meetings at District elementary schools held to discuss the plans and get feedback from the community. About ten people were in attendance.


The rebalance comes as the District plans to close Golden Rule Elementary at the end of the 2013-14 school year. This will be the second elementary school to close in the District within two years, after Layne Elementary closed its doors. This is a part of the District’s plans on consolidating schools for efficiency.


Scott discussed his plans to move the school boundaries in an attempt to balance both program load, and overall the overall student count between elementary schools. Scott expects that Houston, the smallest of the schools, will be home to about 300 students, while the other four will house about 400 students each, with room for about 100 additional students at each school.


Scott also discussed the campus changes across the District, including the move to place 5th and 6th grades in an intermediate school, located at B. McDaniel Middle School. Seventh and 8th grade classes will be relocated to the current high school complex, with 9th through 12th grade moving to the new high school facility, located at the southeast corer of US 75 and Highway 91.


The move to make 5th and 6th grade into an intermediate level is a new idea for the District. The District hopes this will make the move from elementary to higher education a smoother transition, said George Hatfield, assistant superintendent. The District plans on breaking the students into teams of 80, who will stay together throughout intermediate schooling.


"They will go as a family," said Hatfield. "They will go as a team."


"I think it is going to be better socially and psychologically," said Hatfield, referring to the developmental differences between 8th graders and 6th.


The move will open up elective classes to 5th graders, who previously did not have access to these classes until 6th grade. Hatfield discussed plans to create band, vocal music, technology, and art classes designed specifically for 6th grade students.


Questions from parents included the differences in the existing campuses and the possibility of traffic changes around the facilities, particularly around the new high school site.


Another meeting is planned this week for 6 p.m. on Thursday, at Terrell Elementary. Two more meetings are scheduled for 6 p.m. on Jan. 14 and 5 p.m. on Jan. 16 at MayesElementary and Lamar, respectively.