We will put up with a lot of inconvenience for a little bit of convenience. Recently, as I untangled a mess of speaker wires and power cords behind my desk’s computer, I was struck by the fact that those little frustrating quagmires of connectors have quietly resided behind pretty much every computer desk I’ve ever had.

We will put up with a lot of inconvenience for a little bit of convenience. Recently, as I untangled a mess of speaker wires and power cords behind my desk’s computer, I was struck by the fact that those little frustrating quagmires of connectors have quietly resided behind pretty much every computer desk I’ve ever had.


The knots themselves either hang in a particularly unaesthetic knot hovering a foot or two above the floor in an ugly tangle that demands immediate attention, or else, the mess of cords pools patiently on the ground in deceptively appealing tributaries of mismatched widths and shapes, silently awaiting a foolhardy neat freak to tug at one loose end of the mess, bringing the whole river up into a thick, solid tangle.


I usually watch the inevitable tangling unfold slowly from the comfort of my desk chair. There’s a mouse cord crossing over speaker wire now, and later an Internet cable may snake its way into a strangling relationship with the computer’s monitor connector. In true U.S. patriotic fashion, I refuse to do anything about this problem until the consequences cause me some inconvenience. In this case once one of the tangled wires asserts its distress by tugging on an accessory like the mouse.


During the act of pulling apart the M.C. Escher-like shapes created by my laziness, my mind always ponders the odd sense of balance imparted to me by the minutes (which of course feel like hours) I must spend doing this contrition of convenience. I wonder about the ratio of minutes spent in raw frustration to hours spent in screen-hypnotized bliss.


The world of infinite information convenience behind the computer screen is always held captive by the chains of connecting wires one must puzzle together to make the magic happen. The tangled wires are as silent and frustrating as the illuminated computer screen can be loud and bursting with useful information.


Recently, near the final stages of remodeling an old house and working on it late at night, I took advantage of the convenience of a 24-hour store to avail myself of a replacement ceiling fan switch. I thought it was mighty convenient to forgo the wait until the next day for the tiny switch, until I ended up waiting in the one open checkout lane for almost half an hour.


Happy birthday Thursday to Kathy Hopper of Tom Bean; Roger Eichelberger, Millie Greene and Carolyn Phelps, all of Sherman; Gary Shields of Howe; Nan Nilby of Boswell, Okla.; Kristy Robinson of McKinney; Jaiden Bowman of Anna; Amber McKinney and Zakary Dawson.


Happy anniversary Thursday to Jeff and Roseanna Ingram of Pottsboro, 17 years; James and Ariel Dawson, 4 years.