Two documentaries, one from 2003 and another from 2005, about the skinhead and neo-Nazi movements appear to show Bart Alsbrook, interim police chief for the city of Colbert, Oklahoma, discussing his beliefs. During the 2003 documentary by Daniel Schweizer, entitled “Skinhead Attitude,” Alsbrook discusses how he got involved with Blood & Honour, a neo-Nazi music promotion network, and its militant wing Combat 18.

Editor's note: This article has been updated throughout.

Two documentaries, one from 2003 and another from 2005, about the skinhead and neo-Nazi movements appear to show Bart Alsbrook, interim police chief for the city of Colbert, Oklahoma, discussing his beliefs. During the 2003 documentary by Daniel Schweizer, entitled “Skinhead Attitude,” Alsbrook discusses how he got involved with Blood & Honour, a neo-Nazi music promotion network, and its militant wing Combat 18.

“The reason I became a skinhead was I had originally been a member of the Republican Party and always had what would be considered a right wing point of view on politics and the social environment,” Alsbrook says in the documentary.

The documentary does not give Alsbrook’s full name and only refers to him as “Bart” in a segment about the Dallas area. Early in the segment, Alsbrook can be seen walking down Main Street in Denison.

Initial reports

Alsbrook came under fire late last week after KXII reported on apparent connections between him and ISD Records, a neo-Nazi record label which has been identified as a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. The organization updated its Hate Map, a listing with locations of known hate groups, earlier this month following white nationalist protests in Charlottesville, Virginia. The update included a listing for ISD Records in Denison.

The Southern Poverty Law Center identifies Blood & Honour as a hate group and dates its origins back to the mid-1980s in England. The SPLC lists Alsbrook as the Texas coordinator for Blood & Honour USA.

The band Blood & Honour, for which the movement is named, was founded by musician Ian Steward Donaldson in the 1980s. ISD Records bears the initials of Donaldson.

“We have a saying that C18 is basically the militant wing of Blood & Honour,” Alsbrook said in the documentary.

“The C, of course, stands for combat,” Alsbrook says later, describing the arm of the movement. “The number 18 is the first letter of the alphabet — one being A and the eighth letter being H. AH, which stands for Adolf Hitler. So when you draw it out it is Combat Adolph Hitler, which represents a fighting force, combat in the name of national socialism and Adolf Hitler.”

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White nationalism in Texoma

Justin Holbert, a Sherman-based special agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, said there are some white nationalist groups active in the region, however, they appear to be loosely affiliated and have weak organization.

The Aryan Brotherhood of Texas is among these groups, but their activities tend to involve methamphetamine and property crime to feed that addiction, he said.

“The structure of the Aryan Brotherhood has kind of been weakened due to some larger scale cases and arrests in larger cities,” Holbert said. “So it has been weakened and they’re not as organized as they used to be. … Once their upper management gets torn apart, it kind of becomes a scramble to take over or on what the next move will be.”

Holbert said he has never heard of ISD Records or NS88 Videos, but he did find some neo-Nazi language embedded in NS88. In particular, he noted the number 88 as code for Heil Hitler.

The sale of Nazi memorabilia

In 2005, Alsbrook appeared in a second documentary by Schweizer in which he discusses distributing DVD and CD copies of Blood & Honour and other related musical acts. The portion of the documentary following Alsbrook appears to have been filmed in Denison.

During the interview, Alsbrook appears to have an online conversation with a client who is purchasing DVDs. The video cuts to a shot of the screen as the words “I was interviewed for my part in the NS88 videos” appear to be typed.

“Yeah, it is my opinion that the white race is being bred out,” Alsbrook said in the second documentary. “Other races have more children than the white race. It is mathematical. I don’t have any personal feelings about it.”

Alsbrook denies connections

Public records for ISD Records NS88, another website that sells racist memorabilia, are registered under Alsbrook’s name at a Denison address. However, following questions by KXII, both websites went offline and have remained down since. This also corresponds with the removal of other prominent white nationalist and neo-Nazi websites — including Stormfront and the Daily Stormer — by internet service providers in recent weeks.

Alsbrook denied owning the websites to KXII and claimed a group of skinheads stole his wallet in the 1990s during a fight at a heavy metal concert and have been using his name since. Repeated calls to Alsbrook for comment by the Herald Democrat have not been returned. When a reporter went to his Denison home, the reporter was told Alsbrook does live there but wasn’t home at the time.

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Past skinhead activity

Evidence of Alsbrook’s white nationalist activities date back over 20 years. On April 20, 1996, The Dallas Morning News published an article regarding pro-white nationalist website Skinheads U.S.A. and depictions of violence against minorities. The article lists then-28-year-old Bart Alsbrook of North Dallas as the author of the websites.

The article goes on to list “a string of minor convictions in Dallas County” that includes criminal trespass, and an unspecified conspiracy charge. In 1995, Alsbrook was charged with the attempted murder of a former skinhead. However, the charge was dropped when the victim refused to testify, according to the Morning News. Alsbrook told KXII the victim had misidentified him.

“Bart’s one of those guys who’s always a suspect when the skinheads get in trouble,” Sgt. Terry Martin of the Dallas Police Intelligence Unit said in the 1996 article.

Future with the city of Colbert

In response to the questions and public outrage, Alsbrook told the Tulsa World over the weekend that he intended to resign from the Colbert Police Department. Alsbrook is the third police chief to serve within the city in the past year.

However, city spokesperson Jerry Harrell told KXII Monday that the council admires Alsbrook and wishes to keep him on board with the department.

“They don’t want him to leave because he hasn’t done anything they warrant would be grounds for his dismissal,” Harrell said to KXII.

When reached for comment, a representative at Colbert City Hall said the city was not making any additional statements to the media, adding that the city’s words have been twisted in recent interviews on the topic.

'I don’t know the man they are talking about'

Despite the public outrage, some who know Alsbrook have said there is more to the man than what has been shown in the media to this point. Rick Arnold, owner of Arnold’s Martial Arts, said he has been friends with Alsbrook for about seven years after Alsbrook approached him about martial arts training. At the time they met, Alsbrook had just gotten out of a difficult divorce and was trying to leave a part of his past behind, Arnold said, noting they never spoke about the specifics.

Since then, Arnold said, Alsbrook has been a good friend and a good father to his son.

“I am telling you that I think that part of him is in the past,” Arnold said. “There has never been one thing that has made me question his character. I don’t know the man they are talking about.”