With the Fourth of July just around the corner, fireworks are soon to be streaking through the air. But they’re already on the minds of those who sell them and those in the fire safety field.


Christi Cameron, owner of Christi’s Fireworks in Van Alstyne, said the residents of Grayson County have a big appetite for fireworks on the Fourth, and this year, that’s holding true.


“They’re just all American people that want to go out and have fun and blow things up,” Cameron said.


The proud owner of a newly-opened, 4,500-square foot store, Cameron said she has had to order a lot of fireworks to fill her shelves and customers’ shopping carts. Cameron said the firework that’s in highest demand is the 500 Gram.


“They’re the big multi-shot items and it’s the most you can put in a firework,” Cameron said. “You just light it one time and it will go off anywhere from 45 seconds to 90 seconds, just shooting multiple shots up in the air and just huge explosions.”


Cameron said there are fireworks of all shapes and sizes and she encouraged all purchasers, whom must be at least 16 years old, to go through a reputable seller willing to match them with the products that best suit their needs and level of comfort.


And for those that do plan on setting off their own fireworks on the Fourth, Grayson County fire safety officials have a few words of advice.


“Most cities have ordinances against shooting fireworks on city limits,” Grayson County Fire Marshal Kevin Walton said. “So you’re going to have to go out in the unincorporated areas. Make sure you’re on a piece of property where they’re allowing you do that. You can’t just go pick a spot in the country and shoot fireworks. You’ve got to have permission.”


Walton said members of the public should cross North Texas Regional Airport – Perrin Field off their list of launch sites, as no fireworks are permitted on the property. And he added that fireworks should never be ignited in vehicles or on roadways.


“The vehicle deal is a pretty hefty fine, if you get caught,” Walton said. “It’s around $1,000, I believe.”


Once fireworks users do find a suitable location, Walton said it is important to make the site safe.


“It’s probably best to mow the grass short where you’re going to be setting them off,” Walton said. “Even though everything is green looking, we’re getting dry again. And, of course, have sober, adult supervision and have a five-gallon bucket of water on hand.”