Clean living: That’s what Elizabeth Reynolds says she’s always tried to do and it’s worked. This Thursday, Reynolds will be celebrating her 100th birthday.

Clean living: That’s what Elizabeth Reynolds says she’s always tried to do and it’s worked. This Thursday, Reynolds will be celebrating her 100th birthday.


A party for Reynolds is planned for Thursday from 2:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. at Pecan Point Assisted Living Center, 1101 East Pecan Road. On Dec. 29, the Antioch Baptist Church in Bells will have "Elizabeth Reynolds Day" starting with worship services at 11 a.m., followed by a covered dish luncheon. Cake and punch will then be served from 1:30 p.m. until 2:30 p.m. Family and friends are encouraged to attend one or both celebrations.


Reynolds was born in the Pink Hill community located just outside of Bells. She attended Pink Hill school through the 10th grade and then completed her education at Sherman High School from which she graduated.


"When we (students from the Pink Hill school) had to go to Sherman, they put us back a half grade," remembers Reynolds. "They didn’t think we country kids were as smart as the town kids, but we showed them!"


Reynolds laughs about having lots of knicknames through the years. She recalls one in particular.


"I was born about the time the Model T Ford came out, so the kids called me ‘Tin Lizzie,’" says Reynolds.


On Dec. 17, 1933, just nine days shy of her 20th birthday, Reynolds married Elmer Reynolds who lived in the nearby Ida community. The couple lived in the home Reynolds was raised in at Pink Hill and where she herself remained until a year or so ago before moving to Pecan Point. The Reynolds were married for 58 years prior to Elmer Reynolds’ death. Though the couple had no children of their own, Reynolds help raise her younger sister’s children with whom she is very close. She is affectionately called "Memaw" by her sister’s grandchildren and great-grandchildren.


"I call them ‘bonus grands,’" says Reynolds.


Throughout her lifetime, Reynolds was not only a homemaker, but worked in several grocery stores, including the one her father owned at Pink Hill. She served as a cashier, but also stocked shelves and did other needed tasks. Reynolds also remembers the peddler’s who would come by people’s homes, offering their wares.


"When I was a kid, we would have a peddler that came by and we’d swap him eggs and butter for whatever he had on the wagon (that the family needed)," says Reynolds.


From childhood on, Reynolds has been a member of the Antioch Baptist Church located in the Pink Hill community. She served at various times as the church clerk, secretary, treasurer and Sunday School teacher. She also worked with the church’s young people and served as the church pianist for 60 or more years.


To what does Reynolds attribute her 100-year life?


"Good, clean living. No liquor. No smoking. No nothing. Going to church," says Reynolds matter-of-factly. "Just trying to live a clean life!"