Life isn’t always roses, rainbows and laughter. Neither is live theater. The Sherman Community Players’ current production of Rabbit Hole bears witness to that.

Life isn’t always roses, rainbows and laughter. Neither is live theater. The Sherman Community Players’ current production of Rabbit Hole bears witness to that.


The deeply emotional drama delves into a true-life situation that can only be described as an unthinkable nightmare – the tragic loss of a child. A 2007 Pulitzer Prize winner for drama, Rabbit Hole, written by David Lindsay-Abaire, focuses on the once-happy Becca and Howie Corbett and their painful struggle after the death of their son. Loud confrontations, tears, frustration, helplessness and hopelessness - all part of such a tragedy – make up a majority of the production. Lindsay-Abaire wisely scattered a few brief moments of humor within the story to give the audience a chance to relax from the constant waves of sadness. The same happens in real life, even during the worst of situations.


Five experienced actors, three of which are from the DFW metroplex area, make up the Rabbit Hole cast. They bring with them an obvious passion for the production. However, in my opinion, it was Shane Beeson as Howie Corbett and Rebecca Smith as Nat, mother of Becca Corbett, who were the most believable in their roles. From start to finish, it was apparent both were as comfortable on stage as a favorite pair of jeans.


Molly Bower as the grieving Becca Corbett, appeared slightly stiff in her role from time to time. She made up for it, though, in several stand-out moments. Her heart-rending, impassioned pleas for understanding, patience and answers brought tears to a few eyes in the audience.


The role of Becca Corbett’s sister, Izzy, is played by Megan McCullough. Izzy serves as a much-needed comedic break of sorts. McCullough’s portrayal seemed a bit forced at times during the first part of the production, but she fully embrace Izzy’s character as the show progressed and was quite entertaining.


Lastly, Morgan Henard as Jason was seen only briefly during the play. His portrayal of a young man trying to come to terms with his part on the death of the Corbett’s child is well-done and meaningful, especially his final explanation on his theory of the rabbit hole.


Without hesitation, I can say that the SCP production lives up to the play’s award-winning status and is a must-see. I do, however, warn that anyone who has suffered the loss of a child, especially in the not-too-distant past, may not want to view the production. There is also a small amount of strong language, along with adult topics, which could be offensive to some viewers. In my estimation, both the language and topics are completely acceptable considering the dark situation the play is addressing.


Rabbit Hole runs through Feb. 16 at the Finley Theater in Sherman. The play is open to viewers ages 17 and up - no children or young teenagers.


For tickets and more information, call 903-893-8525 or visit www.scptheater.org.