Daniel L. Spuck, currently of the State Correctional Institution of Mercer, Pa., filed a motion in the Federal District Court to enjoin the NFL from hosting playoff games this past Saturday and Sunday, according to the Baltimore (Md.) Sun.

Daniel L. Spuck, currently of the State Correctional Institution of Mercer, Pa., filed a motion in the Federal District Court to enjoin the NFL from hosting playoff games this past Saturday and Sunday, according to the Baltimore (Md.) Sun.


Spuck charged that the Pittsburgh Steelers should be in the playoffs instead of the San Diego Chargers because San Diego benefited from an improper on-field ruling that allowed it to use an illegal defense that caused Kansas City Chiefs kicker Ryan Succop to miss on a 41-yard field goal attempt. Because of that miss, San Diego was able to go on to win the football game in overtime, eliminating the Pittsburgh Steelers from postseason play. San Diego went on to win its playoff game against the Cincinnati Bengals, and will now play against the Denver Broncos.


Spuck wrote in his petition that the Chargers’ improper alignment of seven players on one side of the football should have been penalized five yards and another field goal attempt should have occurred, but the officials missed the play — something the NFL stated was correct the Monday after the game.


He charges fraud because the league does not allow a coach to challenge plays within the final two minutes of a half of football. Spuck also alleges that the new rule stopping play when a player’s helmet comes off is unconstitutional. Kansas City was kept from a touchdown because a Chiefs running back did not score because he was ruled down when his helmet came off. They were unable to score on subsequent plays.


I imagine Spuck would use a Commerce Clause argument (Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution) since an action in Missouri (non –call by NFL officials) potentially had a substantial economic effect on the Pittsburgh Steelers, a Pennsylvania business.


Since Spuck didn’t make the argument, you won’t have to read about whether the business of the NFL is inside or outside the stream of commerce; whether the activity was local or interstate and if the effects from those games were direct or indirect on the activity of interstate commerce.


In his Prayer for Relief, Spuck asked for a temporary injunction of one weekend of NFL playoffs to allow a 37-yard field goal attempt by Succop; a game between Pittsburgh and San Diego to determine the AFC’s sixth seed; and of course $25,000 plus court costs to himself for filing the lawsuit.


While the lawsuit didn’t go anywhere but to the nation’s sports pages and sports websites, it does show that Yogi Berra was right when he said, "It ain’t over ‘til it’s over." Hopefully, Spuck’s approach will teach Alabama fans how to handle Crimson Tide football losses in a different, more dignified manner.