Sherman High School ranks among the state’s 12 best high schools based on student scores on national merit and basic skills tests, as well as other factors. Dr. Tom Anderson, deputy commissioner of education for the Texas Education Agency, announced the results of the statewide survey. Superintendent Wendell Hubbard said, “I’m extremely pleased and think it’s a compliment to the staff and faculty of Sherman High School that they have been chosen. I think it’s certainly a reflection of the community and their support of the public school system.”

COMPILED AND EDITED By Micaela Hoops


SIXTY YEARS AGO


Feb. 19, 1964


The vanguard of more than 200 Katy keglers arrived in Denison today for the start of the annual M-K-T system-wide bowling tournament set for the Denison Bowling Alley. Charlie Reasoner, former Katy official is president of the Katy Bowling Association. He will team with Mayor Harry Glidden in rolling the first ball.


The bowling banquet is a new idea started only two years ago. Curley O’Donnell will be the master of ceremonies at the banquet while a welcoming address will be made by Charles Birge, superintendent of Denison.


This is the first time since 1947 that Denison has hosted the Katy tourney. At that time a Denison entry, the Trainmen, won the system team title.


FIFTY YEARS AGO


Feb. 19, 1964


Hey girls! P-s-s-s-s-t! Don’t look now but there is a boy population explosion underway in the 15-county Circle Ten Boy Scout district. By 1975 there will be 46 per cent more boys in the Texas-Oklahoma district than there is now. The figures have been projected by the Circle Ten Council of the Boy Scouts of America.


In Grayson, only Denison is in Circle Ten and its 19 per cent hike will show an increase of 434 boys in the Scout age bracket to 2,725 by 1975.


The last national report on the ratio of boy babies to girl babies admitted it was a 50-50 but in 1963 the boys held a 51-49 per cent advantage.


FORTY YEARS AGO


Feb. 19, 1974


Becky Leake, 17-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald A. Leake of Sherman, has been named first place winner in the annual Upper Elm-Red Soil and Water Conservation District essay contest, according to J.H. Bayer, chairman of the board of directors.


As first place winner, Miss Leake will receive a $25 award. Subject for this year’s essays was "Our Soil – Our Strength."


Sherman’s winner is a junior student at Sherman High School.


Bayer said 159 entries were received for the contest representing 10 schools from the three-county district of Grayson, Cooke and Montague counties.


THIRTY YEARS AGO


Feb. 19, 1984


Sherman High School ranks among the state’s 12 best high schools based on student scores on national merit and basic skills tests, as well as other factors.


Dr. Tom Anderson, deputy commissioner of education for the Texas Education Agency, announced the results of the statewide survey.


Superintendent Wendell Hubbard said, "I’m extremely pleased and think it’s a compliment to the staff and faculty of Sherman High School that they have been chosen. I think it’s certainly a reflection of the community and their support of the public school system."


Principal Ernie Ritter believes the school was chosen because it emphasizes academics and keeps a balanced program. "We’re hoping something will come of it; at least a visit (from the U.S. Department of Education officials,") said Ritter.


TWENTY YEARS AGO


Feb. 19, 1994


With the high costs associated with solid waste disposal, Denison council members discussed a proposed ordinance, which will ban all lawn waste from city trash collection. Lawn waste includes grass clippings and leaves.


Denison’s public works director, Jerry White, told the council the cost of lawn waste was about $20,000 a year.


However, brush and limbs would still be picked up, though likely by a yet-to-be devised on-call system.


The ordinance would allow Denison residents to still take their own grass and leaves to the landfill and pay the normal tipping rate. However, Mayor Ben Munson IV and council members said hey wanted to see residents mulch their own grass and leaves instead.


While the environmental issues are a part of the decision, council members agreed that the real issue was cost.