STAFF PHOTO — Harold Stevenson, Austin College art instructor, makes a final adjustment of the huge donkey’s head he fashioned from papier-mache for the Arena Theater four-night run of “Shakespeare on a Shoestring.” This long-eared character, in “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” played by Walter Arnold, made a smash hit on opening night when a packed house greeted the Shakespearean program directed by Paul Beardsley. Paul Beardsley came down stage first after the invisible Melrose Tappan III pronounced the prologue from “King Henry V.” Calling the assorted cast before him, Beardsley gave them the same advice which Hamlet gives the players before the play in a play.

COMPILED AND EDITED By Micaela Hoops


Herald Democrat


SIXTY YEARS AGO


March 23, 1954


STAFF PHOTO — Harold Stevenson, Austin College art instructor, makes a final adjustment of the huge donkey’s head he fashioned from papier-mache for the Arena Theater four-night run of "Shakespeare on a Shoestring." This long-eared character, in "Midsummer Night’s Dream," played by Walter Arnold, made a smash hit on opening night when a packed house greeted the Shakespearean program directed by Paul Beardsley.


Paul Beardsley came down stage first after the invisible Melrose Tappan III pronounced the prologue from "King Henry V." Calling the assorted cast before him, Beardsley gave them the same advice which Hamlet gives the players before the play in a play.


Sketches of "A Midsummer Night’s Dream" were first. As Bully Bottom, Walter Arnold bordered on a one-man show. Top support came from Ted Lyons as Peter Quince and Barbara Jacobs as queen of the realistic fairy band of little girl.


In the arena’s darkness. The shoestring plunged abruptly from the whimsical dream to sinister, scheming Richard III, played by Wayne Gill. Alone in his madness, Gill snarled through a scene from "Henry VI" which led directly to a piece of "Richard III."


In the latter light Gill was joined by Martha Kincaid, long a winner locally, as Lady Anne, wife and daughter-in-law of two crown-wearers Gill had killed. Miss Kincaid’s role was well below her capabilities, but her grief-driven wooing with Gill was as mad as could be.


Again sweetness and light pervaded tragedy, with the shoestring winding next through an eyelet of "Twelfth Night." Nona Uehlinger primped herself into a lovely Queen Olivia, Bill Schlottman was adroit in voice-charming as Malvolio, and Amaryliss Tucker as Viola bore her lines lightly.


As the local staging had it, and probably as Shakespeare himself would have ranked it, scenes from "Macbeth" were the finale and the finest. A resonant contralto transfer from Southern Methodist University, Molly Riley, and a blasting bass, Carl Rogers were seen as Lady and Lord Macbeth.


Tappan ended the dramatics with the short adieu from "The Tempest."


FIFTY YEARS AGO


March 23, 1964


McAlester — The Denison Boys Club captured the runners up trophy at the annual Three State Games Room Tourney. McAlester captured the title defeating Denison, Paris, Tulsa, Ada, Fort Smith and Gainesville.


The competition consisted of snooker, billiards, ping-pong and shuffleboard.


Denison representatives included Tam Steel, Leon Bates, Mike Powell, Harold Fisher, Roy Terry and Mike Phillips.


FORTY YEARS AGO


March 23, 1974


STAFF PHOTO — Sherry Anderson, Monda Strange, and Tanya Currah, members of Junior Girl Scout troop 94, pack food for a missionary as a contribution to world Friendship Week. International friendship was the theme of the annual Girl Scout Week just completed. Troup 94 is led by Mrs. James Anderson.


THIRTY YEARS AGO


March 23, 1984


Mrs. Charles N. Turner was selected as "Teacher of the Year" by the Grayson County Music Teachers Association. The honor was based on Mrs. Turner’s many achievements and contributions in the teaching field.



Sherman Musical Arts, Inc. has announced the sixteen recipients of its string scholarships to pay for private violin, cello, viola, or string bass lessons.


The 16 students were selected on the basis of talent and motivation.


Scholarship recipients: Violin — Abe Anderson; Christie Lynn Cagle; Carol Clark; Jessica Depoy; David Manor; Ernest Minchey; Brian Baca; Annette Kremer; Sarah Sweet; Michelle Underwood; Kyne Forbus; and Chris Mullins.


Viola — Kim Stoker and Carmen Valle. Double bass — Clifford Bryant. Cello — Jim Korioth.


TWENTY YEARS AGO


March 23, 1994


STAFF PHOTOS — When Peter Cottontail made an appearance Saturday at Midway Mall, he was surrounded by dancing baby bunnies. Well, all except one were dancing. Young Megan Dutton of Sadler thought the whole thing was silly and wasn’t about to bunny hop in front of a bunch of people.



This group of young entrepreneurs spends their Saturday peddling Kool Aid on a Denison street corner, trying to make a few extra dollars. Jacob Gibby and Jared Kennon handled the advertising with hand-written signs and yelling. Jessie Kennon and Tracie Garvin served the Kool Aid.