Sherman Public Library will open its recently established children’s room with an open house. Young readers, who jumped the gun on the opening are around a table in the new room: Mary Lynn Hughes, Kathy Hughes, Carol Lee Wilson, Barbara Ryman, Jill Mason, Jackie Lynn Duke, Ellis Hackler and John Fletcher. A black and green tile floor has been laid, the walls have been painted a light green and the windows which extend above the ground line have green blinds. Around the walls are the cases holding books especially selected for children from the first through the sixth grade in school.

SIXTY YEARS AGO


March 25, 1954


Sherman Public Library will open its recently established children’s room with an open house. Young readers, who jumped the gun on the opening are around a table in the new room: Mary Lynn Hughes, Kathy Hughes, Carol Lee Wilson, Barbara Ryman, Jill Mason, Jackie Lynn Duke, Ellis Hackler and John Fletcher.


A black and green tile floor has been laid, the walls have been painted a light green and the windows which extend above the ground line have green blinds. Around the walls are the cases holding books especially selected for children from the first through the sixth grade in school.


In 1938 a committee including Mrs. T.R. Cole, Mrs. Arthur Cleckler and Mrs. R.B Aston made a survey of children’s facilities in towns of comparable size.


The war came and the survey and plans were pushed aside. Several years ago, a city ordinance was passed creating a library board. This board has worked with the education committee of the chamber of commerce and with cooperation of the city administration. The original plan has been carried out.


Members of the library board are: G.R. Stephens, C.S Boyles, E.A Haring, Mrs. Charles Rothe and Mrs. J. Frank Chase JR.


FIFTY YEARS AGO


March 25, 1964


Mr. and Mrs. Cooke, a railway mail clerk and a history teacher, respectively, collect antiques to decorate their restored 19th century mansion. The house, part of Denison’s history, was built in 1890 by a Col. McDougal, who operated saloons, a laundry and hotel.


Mr. Cooke fixes old clocks in his spare time and has 60. Mrs. Cooke prefers European antiques, a French desk being her pride and joy. She has a weakness for French China and has her great-grandmother’s China, which came from France.


The two have spent their lives in housing the past. Among Mrs. Cooke’s prized pieces are portraits on porcelain of a peasant and a noble woman by Limoges, which she considers priceless. She has Prussian pieces, orientals in rose medallion, Imari China pieces and many items from the Campbell (soup family) estate.


As the house is explored, their terrier sits at their antique captain’s desk.


The home’s original iron fireplace remains, holding some antiques, in the downstairs bedroom of the 10 room house.


FORTY YEARS AGO


March 25, 1974


SHOWING HER NATION’S COLORS — Miss Gloria Irma Cisneros of Mexico, and a French language instructor at Sherman High School, was among the 23 immigrants who pledged their allegiance Monday to the U.S. in naturalization ceremonies at U.S. District Court here. Nearly a dozen Sherman High students witnessed the ceremony.


THIRTY YEARS AGO


March 25, 1984


Kristi Hill, a 6-foot senior from Howe, is the latest to sign a letter of intent with Grayson’s Lady Vikings.


"She has a nice jump shot and pretty good quickness," GCC coach George Speer said of Hill.


Also signing with the Lady Vikings are 6-foot-1 Sheila Bartley of Denison, Kristin Hendrickson, 5-foot-9, L.D. Bell and Darla George 5-foot-7.


Meanwhile, all six Lady Viking Sophomores are looking to continue their collegiate careers. Susan Baer will sign with Texas Wesleyan while Cindy Phillips is headed to the University of Texas at Arlington. Sharon Rose and Sheila Stowe are bound for North Texas State. Leddy Henley will walk-on at TCU while Nita Garrison is considering a number of offers.


TWENTY YEARS AGO


March 25, 1994


Texoma Medical Center President Art Hohenberger hands over the keys of new ambulance to Denison Fire Chief Bill Taylor while Assistant Fire Chief Gordon Weger and City Manager Larry Cruise look on. The ambulance is a gift from TMC to the city and cost approximately $70,000. It is a mobile intensive care unit and is one of the largest emergency medical vehicles to operate in the area.



Union Pacific Railroad recently presented Grayson County Shelter a check for $2,500. Jerry White, manager of local train operations, and Jack Kyle, vice president of the law department at Union Pacific, toured the facility before giving the check to Rebecca Kearny, treasurer of the shelter’s board of directors. The money will be used for general operating expenditures.