Patti Castleberry, guest director for the next major Sherman Community Players production “Morning’s at Seven,” has announced her cast for the April show. Cast in the roles of the four elderly sisters are Myra Schultz, Betty Jo Thompson, Betty Harper and Marianne Daniels. The husbands of three of the sisters will be portrayed by Gus Jones, Tom Willsher and Goodloe Lewis.

COMPILED AND EDITED By Micaela Hoops


Herald Democrat


SIXTY YEARS AGO


March 13, 1954


A survey of country stores reveals that folks have just about quit dipping snuff.


R.S. McAdams of Gordonville has been in the store business for 55 years, and he reports snuff sales definitely are not what they used to be.


"For instance," he point out, "women have practically stopped dipping snuff altogether. In fact, I don’t know of any lady who dips any more."


"We used to have some women who smoked pipes," he said, "but off-hand I can’t recall that any still does."



Congratulations to the Sherman Garden Club for the beautification project along the Lamar St. side of West Hill Cemetery. A hedge row of 100 red bud trees, given by Mr. and Mrs. Prince Kinsey from their farm north of Sherman, and 69 crepe myrtle bushes, bought by the club has been planted.


Another project of the garden group was planting the big flower bed in front of the east door of the municipal building. Nandina bushes border the bed, and perennials will be set in the center.


FIFTY YEARS AGO


March 13, 1964


Jerry D. Parish, a Sherman High School senior, stands next to his engineering drawing of a cotton gin machine. The drawing won first place in distrct competition at Irving in vocational industrial training. He won three first places. Parish is a draftsman trainee at Hardwicke-Etter Co. in Sherman.


Sherman High students received 16 first places, 12 second places, seven third places, and more competing against 800 students from Wichita Falls, Tyler, Waco, Denison, Fort Worth and Grand Prairie.


FORTY YEARS AGO


March 13, 1974


When Henrietta Schacherbauer worked in the U.S. Bureau of Printing and Engraving in Washington, D.C., her greatest frustration was in not having the opportunity to design an all new set of currency for Uncle Sam. As an artist she felt she could improve its looks.


Mrs. Schacherbauer said when you handled as much paper money as I did "it is easy to understand how you can feel that the money is rather worthless. To you it becomes nothing but just printed paper."


Her husband, in the air force, first visited the South in Sherman. They had met in Washington D.C. and retired in Sherman because "he could golf all year round," she said.


Mrs. Schacherbauer’s paintings hang in prominent gallerys from coast to coast and in private collections. She works in all mediums and is a highly prolific painter.


Since coming to North Texas and joining the growing art colony here, the native Georgian is proving to be one of the finest additions to art the area has ever had.


THIRTY YEARS AGO


March 13, 1984


Patti Castleberry, guest director for the next major Sherman Community Players production "Morning’s at Seven," has announced her cast for the April show. Cast in the roles of the four elderly sisters are Myra Schultz, Betty Jo Thompson, Betty Harper and Marianne Daniels. The husbands of three of the sisters will be portrayed by Gus Jones, Tom Willsher and Goodloe Lewis.


Rounding out the cast are Andy Williams as the son of one of the sisters, and Carol Horn as his fiancée. Thomas Lilly will serve as stage manager, Matt Turner will handle the sound and lighting and Joe Maglio will construct the set.


Mrs. Castleberry said that "Morning’s at Seven" is considered by most critics to be one of the best of American comedies. She said the story, set in the 1920s, is an affectionate portrait of a Midwestern family as they muddle through the commonplace events of small-town life.


TWENTY YEARS AGO


March 13, 1994


Josh Taylor, a Denison High School freshman, is hoping to experience other cultures this summer through the People-to-People Student Ambassador Program. The organization based in Spokane, Wash., selected Taylor as one of the area’s high school student to visit Australia and New Zealand.


Taylor would stay with families in "the Outback," and would visit places such as the Great Barrier Reef and the rainforests. The trip would last three weeks.


President Dwight D. Eisenhower founded People-to-People in 1956 to help Americans reach out to citizens of other countries and to foster world peace. Eisenhower was the first chairman of the board of People to People International, and seven U.S. presidents have worked as honorary chairman, continuing the tradition.