HOWE — A cheerful little man, a retired watchmaker, has solved Howe’s biggest riddle with admission he was leader of the gang that tied the jail onto the back of a northbound freight. He was A.L. Edwards, 78. “It was the only way we could get a real ‘bad actor’ out of town,” he said.

Feb. 7, 1954


SIXTY YEARS AGO


HOWE — A cheerful little man, a retired watchmaker, has solved Howe’s biggest riddle with admission he was leader of the gang that tied the jail onto the back of a northbound freight. He was A.L. Edwards, 78, "Rabbit Gang" boss. "We gave everybody a fair trial," said Edwards, "but we didn’t fool around with putting anybody in jail. We just told them to get out and stay out."


This was the case when they jailed a "real bad actor," but Edwards and the gang thought this wasn’t enough. After yanking the jail off the wall of the building, they hitched it to the train. The train nearly derailed but managed to pull it away. There hasn’t been a jail in Howe since.



A "star border" at the Boy Scout’s camp on Lake Texoma throughout last summer was a young buzzard captured in the area. It served as a live model for the nature study group, who were working for a Merit Badge, and became the pet of the camp— Brent Hempkins was the instructor at this particular session.


Feb. 7, 1964


FIFTY YEARS AGO


Al Clymer, son of Mrs. A.A. Clymer, was honored with a one-man show at the Mink Art Gallery in Bryan. On exhibit were 22 of his paintings in oil, casin and watercolor.


Clymer is a four year student of architecture at Texas A&M. He also gave a commentary on his paintings on the Bryan television station.


He paints mostly in a contemporary style that is creative and in many cases uses experimental techniques. His colors are bright and many have blue as the dominant color.


Feb. 7, 1974


FORTY YEARS AGO


Four women ranked high in the Southwest Parks & Recreation Training Institute at the Texoma Lodge. Jean Craft, a 28 year veteran of Dallas’s P & R department, said "Sure we get the same flack from our husbands that I’m sure men get from their wives when their work keeps them overtime or busy on weekends. Or attending conventions like this," she added smilingly.


Eva Evans, handling public informationOuachita National Forest in Arkansas since 1959; apart from writing columns and magazine pieces, she is the guide for VIP visits to the forest. Janet Wagner heads a landscape design firm, and takes dead aim at the creating a beautiful exterior. "The first thing the public sees is the exterior of a building and if it isn’t properly landscaped, it looses much of its appeal," said the landscape executive.


Jennifer Dukya, a Texas Aggie coed, wowed the 500 attending with her talk of Americanism. "Freedom isn’t free," she said. "You love America or you wouldn’t be so interested in really wating to make America beautiful."


Feb. 7, 1984


THIRTY YEARS AGO


Sherman Community Players presents "Play It Again, Sam," Woody Allen’s award winning comedy. The play revolves around Allen Felix, played by Gil Nelson, who wants to be a hit with women after his wife leaves him for "insufficient laughter." He turns in desperation to his idol—Humphrey Bogart, played by Joe Maglio. With the aid of the imaginary Bogart, and surrounded by a bevy of fantasy women, Felix finally learns to succeed.


Other players include, Richard and Leslie Jernigan, Cyndi Runnels, Vickie White, Charlene Ford, Wanda Nelson, Janetta Maglio, Lisa Russell and Stacy Boatman.


Feb. 7, 1994


TWENTY YEARS AGO


Joe Texas Restaurant in Southmayd presents "The Texas Cowboy (We Ain’t Dead Yet)," a dinner and show featuring Robert Joe Vandygriff.


With a mixture of fact and folklore, Vandygriff entertains guests with original and popular music, storytelling, poetry, and costume changes commemorating the legacy of the Texas cowboy from the mid-1800s to modern times.


Local history will be incorporated with references to cattle trails, local ranches, including the Sanborn Ranch, which was the first in Texas to use and promote barbed wire fencing.